Archive for the ‘Newsletters’ Category

APLDNJ WINTER WORKSHOP – JAN. 28th,2017


APLD-NJ WINTER WORKSHOP:
 
6 STEPS TO A PEST FREE GARDEN
 
AND
 
GET THE BUGS OUT OF YOUR BUSINESS
 
JANUARY 28th
 
 9 AM – 2 PM
 
The Holly House
Rutgers Gardens
130 Log Cabin Road
New Brunswick, NJ  08901
 
 
 
APLD members-$50
 Nonmembers $65
 
 Lunch is included (vegetarian options available)
 
 

APLD members
All others



 
 
 
Six Steps to a Pest Free Garden
 
Jessica Walliser, author, horticulturalist, bug-lover, will speak about her approach to pest free gardening.
 
 
 
Six Steps to a Pest Free Garden
 
In this lecture Jessica outlines an easy to follow six step pest control plan. Using techniques based on both Integrated Pest Management and natural-care gardening, this plan enables gardeners to manage any pest troubles safely, effectively, and organically. Information about biological, botanical, physical, and mechanical controls is offered; and there’s plenty of practical and useful advice for boosting a plant’s natural immune system.
She is author of the Amazon best-seller Good Bug, Bad Bug: Who’s Who, What They Do, and How to Manage Them Organically and blogs weekly for both SavvyGardening.com and HobbyFarms.com. Her fourth book, Attracting Beneficial Bugs to the Garden: A Natural Approach to Pest Control, was released by Timber Press in January of 2014 and was named one of the Top 12 Gardening Books by Martha Stewart Living magazine in March of 2015. It was also awarded the American Horticultural Society’s Book Award.
As owner of Ironweed Apparel, Jessica is working to unite fashion and gardening at long last by providing gardeners with hip, funky urban farming and gardening tee shirts that let you grow in style.
Jessica lives and gardens northwest of Pittsburgh with her husband and son, six chickens, two cats, two hermit crabs, and billions and billions of very good bugs.
 
 
Get the Bugs Out of Your Business 
 
Through lecture and breakout sessions Mary Allen will demonstrate proven techniques for increasing your success rate in 3 vital areas.
 
In this workshop, Mary will take you over three hurdles business owner can face. She will give you tools for improving your sales efforts, business planning strategies for the long term, and ways to create better business outcomes through your relationships with customers and employees.
Participants will walk away with a simple and manageable business plan ready to be immediately implemented. Ideas will be shared for improving your company’s story to ensure you are keeping a full pipeline of business opportunities. Simple and practical tools will be introduced to establish and manage targets to ensure you are achieving your financial goals one business quarter at a time. And you will walk away with practical tips for managing the human element while protecting your revenues and your profitability. Please bring your sales materials your website where your readers can get further details.
 
Please bring your sales materials to share.
 
 
Mary W. Allen
 
Mary excels in strategic planning, operational excellence and community engagement. She is a strong leader with broad marketing and operations experience. She brings her unique insights to clearly see “what can be” by providing vision and clarity. She quickly develops connections between insights and solutions in the most challenging business environments producing excellent outcomes.
 
She believes that you can influence future outcomes through proper planning and both creative and critical thinking. She has developed tools for this technique and has trained others with great success. She has a passion for customer understanding and service through the culinary arts and design. Mary earned her BA from BOSTON COLLEGE, Chestnut Hill, MA. 
 
Currently, she is a district manager for the Sodexo Corporation with clients in central NJ and PA including Sanofi, Teva Pharmaceuticals, BAE, Nestle, Ericsson, Roche and Life Cell. She lives in Media PA with her husband David and her daughters Elizabeth and Grace.
 
NEED DIRECTIONS??  CLICK HERE

 

September 2015 Newsletter

September, 2015
September 2015 Newsletter
In This Issue
President’s Message
Sneak Peek!
Fun Photo
Getting Ready for Change
Member News
APLD International Design Conference
From Pleasant Run Nursery
From Experienced Brick and Stone
A Call for Submissions…
 

Chapter meeting/event Dates

 

 

Dates to  

Remember

 

 


Our Sponsors

 

 

 

 GOLD

  

NJ Deer Control

Bartlett Tree Experts

 

SILVER

 

 

 

  

Spring Meadow Nursery, Inc. 

BRONZE
 
    
________
 See our website for more about these sponsors…
BECOME A MEMBER


President’s Message
 
It must have been three weeks ago that I heard a large flock of geese flying south along the Delaware River. This morning I saw a squirrel, its face nearly obscured by a mouth full of grass and bark strips, on its way to building a winter nest.

It takes a few signs that winter is coming before I settle in and focus on what’s good about it. Not to be misunderstood, I love all of the seasons.  Winter is often a vacation season for me so what’s not to love?  But it is a reminder that all projects must be wrapped up and finished in the next few weeks.  All promises are to be fulfilled and plans for the next year are to be laid out.

And so we have begun to finalize plans for our 2016 APLDNJ Winter Workshop and Lecture series. We are very excited to be hosting W. Gary Smith for a hands workshop, “Unleashing Creativity in Garden Design”.   A designer of botanical gardens and arboretums, as well as public installations, Smith approaches design from an artist’s perspective.  His inspiration comes from poetry and dance, drawings and paintings, sculptures and childhood. He is a recipient of a national Award of Distinction from APLD for his work on the Enchanted Woods at Winterthur Museum and Country Estate in Delaware and for Pierces Woods at Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania.

In this one day workshop you will unleash new forms of personal creativity, developing your own visual vocabulary of shapes, patterns, and forms to use in garden design. We will explore ways to look at the garden through the eyes of your own inner artist. You are invited to bring and share a sketch or plan of a current design, or simply bring your willingness to stretch your creativity and imagination. No previous artistic experience is required.

We are also excited to welcome one of our own.  Despina Metaxatos will give a talk on “Spaces of Aura”Speaking as an artist, she will illustrate the way in which memorable spaces are distinct from their surroundings, in some irregular way.

The view of this downed willow from a park bench offers both prospect and refuge. The happy accident of what is chosen to leave behind creates its own space of Aura.
Remnants of the historical–even the geological–past may collide with the present.  In this dynamic tension, we become aware of our own passage through time.  The juxtaposition of sublime and abject is particularly poignant in the landscape, creating some of our most powerful, provocative, and unexpected spaces.  There is rich potential in conflicted sites, as we evolve and expand our perspective of what landscape can be.

 Ours is an industry meant to challenge and inspire creativity and problem solving. It asks us to look deep within ourselves, to “evolve and expand our perspective”. I hope that you can all participate in these winter events and benefit from these inspiring people. So as each season passes, another begins, as do the opportunities to grow and learn.

I can be reached at hggardendesign@gmail.com or (908) 285-1281.

Most sincerely,
Helen Grundmann


Sneak Peek!
 
2016 Winter Workshop!
APLD NJ is working on scheduling 
W. Gary Smith for….

“Unleashing Creativity in Garden Design”

All artistic expression begins with the self, and in this workshop you will unleash new forms of personal creativity, developing your own visual vocabulary of shapes, patterns, and forms to use in garden design. We will explore simple techniques for unleashing personal creativity, looking at the garden through the eyes of your own inner artist. You are invited to bring and share a sketch or plan of a current design, or simply bring your willingness to stretch your creativity and imagination. No previous artistic experience is required.

Schedule
9:30-10:00   Introductions
10:00-11:30  Lecture: Developing a Personal Design Vocabulary
11:30-12:00  Discussion
12:00-1:00    Lunch
1:00-2:00     Drawing exercise – abstracting patterns
2:00-3:30     Drawing exercise – using patterns in design
3:30-4:30     Pin-up, critique, discussion

This workshop will be in either January or February 2016–watch your email for details!
 

Fun Photo

 
 
  
Helen Grundmann submitted this photo sent by Sharon Hollfelder, Landscapes by Sharon. Photo of Tim Ghiselli, looking gorgeous “wearing” Clematis paniculata.


Getting Ready for Change

APLD restructures membership categories and requirements starting in 2016.

Background

Since its inception in 1989, APLD has represented professional landscape designers on many fronts, including in the legislative and advocacy arenas. In recent years, regulations have increased in many professions, and landscape design is no exception. An ad hoc task force was created to address raising the level of professionalism within the APLD membership to enable better representation of the profession with regulatory bodies. After
two years of study, a final recommendation was made to and approved by the APLD Board of Directors in November 2014.

Course of Action

The approved changes will restructure all membership categories and requirements. This restructure defines all levels of membership and outlines specific professional requirements for each category including levels of education, professional documentation, years of experience and a commitment to continuing education. A synopsis of the new categories of membership and requirements can be found here.
These changes will take effect for the January 2016.

Next Steps

There are several things you can do to ready yourself for the upcoming changes:

1. Identify your category of membership and determine the education and documents you will need to gather.

2. Look at the CEU requirements for your membership level and start planning for your continued professional development.

3. Review the certification requirements, if you are eligible, and start planning to attain this status of membership in 2015.

4. Pay attention over the next few months to the Design Online
and eblasts for more specific information as well as a description of each new membership category.

APLD is committed to advancing the profession of landscape design through higher professional standards, and the membership initiative underscores that commitment.


Member News

Gardens of the Heart
by Cindy Coppa

Secret hiding places among the Privets, an old Catalpa tree to sit in, dragonflies to catch, and ripe Jersey tomatoes picked on the run.  These are some of the memories and past privileges of a city kid.  Where have all these childhood amenities gone?

Since the 1960s, development in Elizabeth has eliminated green vacant lots and older homes, having transformed them into rental properties with plenty of asphalt and concrete.  Occupant families, especially children, have a lower quality of life as a result; and nature deficit makes poor environmental stewards. In more ways than one, disconnect has been the status quo.
Enter the penniless visionary, LOL.
The Elizabeth Conservancy Inc. (EC), a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, was founded on a passion to remediate for what has been lost.  Following the real estate market crash, four adjacent lots in a residential neighborhood known as Peterstown, were purchased via a NJ Green Acres grant and other funding-corner to corner with frontage on three streets, a half acre of potential awaiting new life. Derelict buildings were demolished recently, removing the eyesore.  A few precious trees were saved, including twoSaucer Magnolias and a row of Figs.Next steps include a small solar-powered environmental education center surrounded by gardens-organic community food gardens, and a natural play garden for young children.  The EC will serve as a local resource and a model for city gardeners and other non-profit groups; it is permanently preserved for such use by an easement.

Design Approach
By providing land for growing food, space for children to interact with natural elements, and education that encompasses both, we can address fundamental needs and permanently tie them to land stewardship.  This three-point design approach will aid project sustainability as all three elements are interconnected, support each other, and comprise the whole.  Establishing a place where neighbors can meet and actually get to know one another fosters real community as well.  In a time of ever-increasing ways to connect via technology, we lack local places to “plug in” for face-to-face contact. What better place than a garden?

The overall landscape design of the
Elizabeth Conservancy Environmental Education Center & Gardens is intended to be aesthetically pleasing, not just practical-to lift spirits and aspirations of city dwellers.  Espalier pear trees grown over 12 ft. wide arches will create a green tunnelthat will lead gardeners to the greenhouse from our Doyle Street entrance.  A bi-level, kid-friendly water feature curving downward will accent our main entrance on Redcliffe Street.  Special attention is being given to plant selection / placement to encourage play and exploration by young children, while their parents tend to their garden plots.  Raised beds of various levels will be installed for growing vegetables, a rain garden edged by a seat wall will mitigate storm water, cisterns will capture roof water for landscape irrigation, and a pergola will highlight the main gathering area.  Most outdoor features will be accessible to the physically challenged. An overriding objective is to create momentum for the establishment of similar garden-centered neighborhoods within our city and shift the paradigm of community planning.

The Building
We recently discovered that everything we intend for our building is available in a neat green package called “Sprout Space”-cutting edge green pre-fab modules that can be combined, customized, and finished on site ; created by Architects Perkins + Will as educational units. See www.sproutspace.com   Our Sprout Space structure will be rendered in neutral colors to blend quietly into the landscape and neighborhood. It will offer a greenhouse, resource room, office, and a multi-purpose room which opens onto a porch and the gardens. Finally, the entire property will be gated and enclosed by black ornamental fencing.

The Elizabeth Conservancy project has been a walk of faith from day one and it remains so. In-kind professional services, materials, and monetary donations have been generous and vital to moving forward; and they are still needed.  If you are in a position to assist with our project or can connect us with potential funders, please contact me at 908-906-6386 (cell) or cindycoppa@verizon.net    Our mailing address is:
Elizabeth Conservancy, P.O. Box 6901,
Elizabeth, New Jersey 07202.   Our website: www.elizabethconservancy.org will launch soon.

APLD 
 International Design Conference
October 8-11, 2015
Washington, DC
Get it on your calendar now!

APLDNJ Members Abroad!

A few of our members in Ireland.
From left:
Susan Olinger, Lauren VonGerichton, Ruth Bowers, Barbara Miller, Pamela Dabah, Helen Grundmann.
Photo submitted by Susan Olinger.


From our Sponsor– 
Pleasant Run Nursery 
 by Heidi Hesselein

There is an explosion of exciting options in the world of small ornamental trees, and we have our own favorites at Pleasant Run Nursery.  What we look for is multi-season interest and wide tolerance of diverse growing conditions.  In the interest of keeping this article short, I have chosen 5 winners.

Heptacodium miconioides, or Seven-Son Flower, is an Asian tree which offers an alternative to the Crapemyrtles which took such a beating in the last 2 winters. Its zone hardiness of 4 is excellent, and its size of 20′ makes it reasonable as a multi-stem or single-stem tree in smaller gardens.  Heptacodium comes into bloom in late July with a plethora of fragrant small white flowers in large, long-blooming clumps.  When the blooms drop, making a white carpet, they are followed by rose-red calyxes which are just as showy as Lagerstroemia flowers, as well as long-lasting.  After the leaves drop in the fall, the creamy exfoliating barkprovides winter interest, especially after snowfall.  Seven-Son flower is a pollinator attractant and is happy in both sun and partial shade.

Nyssa sylvatica (Black Gum) is a very important native tree for many reasons, but the growth habit often leaves a lot to be desired.  Nyssa sylvatica Green Gable™is an introduction from Alex Neubauer of Tennessee, and is a beautiful upright form that wants to grow straight and uniform.  The lustrous green leaves are clean and attractive (like a much more responsible form of Callery Pear).  Green Gable™ blooms heavily in early summer so it is an important source of food for native pollinators (think “Tupelo Honey”).  The fall foliage is stunning shades of red and orange,making its show early in the season.  The regular, ascending branches make an attractive silhouette in the winter landscape.  Like all Nyssas, Green Gable™ is tolerant of a very wide variety of soil and site conditions, from dry to wet and sun to shade.

Poliothyrsis sinensis (Chinese Pearlbloom) fills the “late summer bloom” niche beautifully, becoming covered with airy pyramidal ivory racemes in late July and early August.  The habit is upright and broadly pyramidal,with bronze colored new foliage which turns a clean green as the leaves mature.  The ivory flowers ripen to interesting brown seed capsules and the resemblance to Japanese Tree Lilacs is striking, confusing plant people by the presence of flowers so much later than lilacs are supposed to bloom.  The fall color is an attractive yellow, and winter interest is provided by the interesting brown-gray bark.  This is definitely a “stump your friends” tree.  An added bonus is that Poliothyrsis is a butterfly attractant because of the fragrant blooms.

Styrax japonica “Emerald Pagoda” was selected by Dr. JC Raulston when he spotted it on an island in Korea. It stands out from ordinary Japanese Snowbells because of its exceptional vigor and tree-form habit.  The beautiful white bell flowersare definitely larger than typical Snowbells, as are the lustrous, thicker green leaves.  We have found that “Emerald Pagoda” is more tolerant of both heat and cold than the regular species.  The smooth dark grey-brown bark is attractive in the winter, as is the tidy oval shape of the canopy.

Taxodium distichum Shawnee Brave™ is a beautiful Baldcypress introduced by Earl “Mr. Heritage Birch” Cully.  It is a particularly lovely deciduous native conifer, with soft fern-like foliage emerging in early spring.  The fine short needles darken in color as the summer progresses.  The fall display is particularly glorious, as the needles take on reddish-tan hues before falling to form a soft carpet under the tree.  Shawnee Brave™ has a striking form in the winter, when its straight trunk and extremely regular branching habit impart a wonderful silhouette to the landscape.  Taxodiums are extremely tolerant of salt and wet sites and with a Zone 4 cold hardiness, they are “bullet-proof” trees for both sun and shade.  Although Shawnee Brave™ can reach a height of 60′ eventually, it stays very narrow, so it can be used effectively in tight spaces.


Reclaimed Materials for Hardscape 
…by Experienced Brick and Stone

Reclaimed materials are durable, beautiful and have stood the test of time. Brick and stone that has been in use for over 100 years, worn smooth by steps through time, can add warmth and character to your landscaping project.

Many manufactured materials seek to imitate the richness of aged materials because of their appeal. Fortunately there is a strong trend to reclaim which is helping to insure an ample supply.  Reclaimed materials include street brick pavers, curbing, stone sidewalks, and building stone.  By reclaiming these special historical materials they are saved from being crushed or dumped in landfills.

Historical street bricks are very dense and impervious to water.They add special distinction and warmth to walkways, patios, driveways and sidewalks. Made from clay and shale that was double-fired in crude beehive kilns, that were commonplace 100 years ago, they naturally have an attractive varied color pallet.  You can expect them to provide durable and beautiful surfaces for your residential, commercial, or “Main Street” project, for the next 100 years and beyond.
Medina Sandstone was discovered in NY while digging the ErieCanal through the Medina area in 1825. Numerous quarries operated during the 1800′s to provide stone for buildings and streets in New York State as well as being shipped to many other countries. Today this stone is reclaimed in the form of steps, street curbing, street cobbles, sidewalk slabs, and building block.  They have wonderful color variation, from dusty rose to warm gray and brown.  These pieces of history are perfect for steps, driveways, garden walls, and special projects where old world charm is desired.
Reclaimed stone also includes granite cobbles in various sizes, and shapes.  Much of this stone was brought from Europe as ships ballast.  The cobbles were used to pave the streets of port cities along the east coast.  These make unique driveways, commercial areas as well as garden bed edging.

Make your project unique with reclaimed materials and know that you rescued a piece of history to be enjoyed for generations to come.

To find out more out reclaimed materials call Experienced Bricks & Stone at 716-691-3061 or visit www.exbricks.com.
 

Thank you to all of our sponsors!

 

  Our  Sponsors….

GOLD 

  

   

SILVER  

 LP STATILE ad

Brock farms logo

  PRN logo
Outdoor Lighting Perspectives
BRONZE

  

Walpole Woodworkers

 Halls Garden Center snip

Jeannie Marcucci
APLD New Jersey Chapter Writer

A Call for Submissions….
Anybody looking to submit articles or photos for future newsletters please send your questions and material to:
Jeannie Marcucci
Please, if submitting photos, please do not imbed them into the body of the word document–attach to email separately!

July 2015 Newsletter

July, 2015
July, 2015
July 2015 Newsletter
In This Issue
President’s Message
APLDNJ Summer Event
Getting Ready for Change
Member News
APLD International Design Conference
NJNLA Summer Plant Symposium
Happy Hydrangeas
A Call for Submissions…
WELCOME
NEW MEMBERS
 Chapter meeting/event Dates

 

 Dates to  

Remember

 

 
Our Sponsors

 

 

 GOLD

  

NJ Deer Control

Bartlett Tree Experts

 

SILVER

 

 

 

  

Condurso’s GardenCenter

Moonlight Complements 

Spring Meadow Nursery, Inc. 

BRONZE
 

NatureScape Lighting

    
________
 See our website for more about these sponsors…
BECOME A MEMBER

President’s Message 

By all accounts it seems landscaping is alive and well in the Garden State and surrounding areas!  I’m happy to hear that so many of you are busy beyond words. However, it also means working harder to maintain some semblance of balance in our lives. Besides reminding myself to breathe in AND out, I’m trying to look at it as a time to assess how I design.

One influencing factor has been the weather. After a seemingly endless winter, I began to wonder what happened to spring.  Upon its arrival, I counted almost 6 weeks without meaningful rain.   When the rain came it came 2-5 inches at a time.  Thankfully it now appears to be self regulating at a more manageable rate.  When I look back I realize we have lost no more than 2 half days of work this year. So, given that, I am paying more attention to what survived and what actually thrived after the winter and what managed to put up with the vicissitudes of spring in New Jersey. Remarkably, the rains came just as the hydrangeas were waking up.  They are stunning this year! Our young apple orchard is finally producing enough fruit to make a few pies.  Laurels and hollies continue to take a hit and many of the daffodils and peonies were cut short by the early heat and heavy downpours.

Another factor is the paradox of time saving technology.  It seems that because we can do more in less time, we do more and have less time. On August 5th we will have the opportunity to travel to another time when lingering wasn’t such a luxury. Connie Webster will take us on a tour of the gardens of Andre Le Notre that influenced an entire landscape movement in France.  The chief architect of such gardens as the tapestry like gardens of Versailles and Vaux-le-Vicomte , Le Notre grew up among a family of noteworthy and influential gardeners. He grew up on the grounds of the Jardin des Tuileries where his father was head gardener.  This program will also demonstrate his influence around the world.  It is sure to be inspiring. Plan to attend at 6:00 on August 5th at Holly House on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, NJ . Middle Eastern food will be served.
I can be reached at hggardendesign@gmail.com or 908 285-1281.
Most sincerely,

Helen Grundmann


APLDNJ Lecture
APLDNJ’s Summer Event

 

August 5, 2015
 
 
Connie Webster will speak on The French Classical Garden: Andre’ Le Notre’s Influence in France and Beyond.

 

6:00 Holly House, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Connie Webster will take us on a virtual tour through the classical gardens of Andre’ Le Notre, the landscape architect of Louis the XVI. He was born into a family of gardeners and his work is seen as defining the height of French formal garden style. Among a few of his most notably gardens are Vaux-le-Vicomte, Versailles, Fountainebleau and Jardin des Tuileries where he grew up. But his work extends far beyond France and includes gardens in Italy, the Netherlands, England and Austria as well as others.

As a French Major and a Rutgers professor, Connie researched French gardens, their architecture and history. At Rutgers she also met her husband, John, an architect, who now joins her as her photographer. Dinner will include a Middle Eastern meal.

To register for this event, contact:

Link to Directions to Holly House:

Please RSVP to:

Ruth Bowers

or to

Barbara Miller

 

 

 


Getting Ready for Change
APLD restructures membership categories and requirements starting in 2016.
Background
Since its inception in 1989, APLD has represented professional landscape designers on many fronts, including in the legislative and advocacy arenas. In recent years, regulations have increased in many professions, and landscape design is no exception. An ad hoc task force was created to address raising the level of professionalism within the APLD membership to enable better representation of the profession with regulatory bodies. After
two years of study, a final recommendation was made to and approved by the APLD Board of Directors in November 2014.
Course of Action
The approved changes will restructure all membership categories and requirements. This restructure defines all levels of membership and outlines specific professional requirements for each category including levels of education, professional documentation, years of experience and a commitment to continuing education. A synopsis of the new categories of membership and requirements can be found here.
These changes will take effect for the January 2016 renewal period, so you have a full year to prepare!
Next Steps
There are several things you can do to ready yourself for the upcoming changes:
1. Identify your category of membership and determine the education and documents you will need to gather.
2. Look at the CEU requirements for your membership level and start planning for your continued professional development.
3. Review the certification requirements, if you are eligible, and start planning to attain this status of membership in 2015.
4. Pay attention over the next few months to the Design Online
and eblasts for more specific information as well as a description of each new membership category.
APLD is committed to advancing the profession of landscape design through higher professional standards, and the membership initiative underscores that commitment.


Member News
Barlow’s Landscaping
“Art in the Green House” Display
Photos submitted by Damien Ball

APLD 
 International Design Conference
October 8-11, 2015
Washington, DC
Get it on your calendar now!

NJNLA
New Jersey Nursery & 
 Landscape Association
Summer Plant Symposium
August 11, 2015
Rutgers University 
For more info, Click Here

This week– 
 from Pleasant Run Nursery
I needed to build some containers to go alongside the entrance to the building where I have my studio. Here is the outcome from PRN…
Asimina “Rebecca’s Gold,” Chasmantheum latifolium, Echinacea x Butterfly Julia, Dryopteris erythrosora, Hosta “Fire Island,” Carex pensylvanica. The container will only be on site for the rest of the season before the plants go out to a larger garden. 

 

Happy Hydrangeas

 

One group of plants that has a near universal appeal among gardeners is the Hydrangea.  Admittedly, I have long been infatuated by this group of plants myself! This adoration is compounded by the onslaught of new cultivar introductions over the past 25 years, ensuring that there is now at least one Hydrangea suitable for nearly every garden!  However, there is still much mystery to this group of plants, with much of that mystery focusing upon how various Hydrangeas should best be pruned.  Hopefully, some of the mystery can be resolved!

Hydrangea was first penned by the Swedish Botanist, Physician and Zoologist, Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778) in 1753.  The name is derived from the Greek Hydor, meaning water and Angos, meaning vessel or jar.  Thus, its direct translation is water jar!  The name refers to either the general shape of the showy sterile florets, which are shaped like a cup or it may refer to the seed pods, which resemble miniature water jars.  Although most likely not the affiliation with water that Linnaeus was considering, many species will also wilt painfully during periods of drought and need copious amounts of water during periods of prolonged drought!  The four species of Hydrangea that are most frequently used in NJ gardens are native to 4 distinct regions of the world, which proves helpful when deciding how to prune the plants.  Those native to colder regions of the world produce flower buds on new wood.  If the previous year’s growth was frozen to the ground during extreme cold spells or possibly grazed by a hungry

animal, the plant would be able to rebound, produce flowers and seed during the following year, ensuring new future plants.  By contrast, if the plant is native to warmer winter climates and winters wrath is no longer a concern, it is more energy efficient for the plant to produce the flower buds on the previous year’s wood, and avoid the need to push 3-6′ of new growth before blooming.
Hydrangea arborescens, the Smooth Hydrangea, is native from New York to Florida and West to Missouri.  In the wild, the plants are typically found growing in shaded sites in soils that are often moist or humus-rich.  The species epithet of arborescens refers to the similarity of the form of plants found in the wild to that of a tree.   Since it is native to the cold climates of New England, it blooms on new wood.  Consequently, this plant can be pruned to the ground at any point from January through late March (image above right). This also helps the overall shape of the plant, as the stems or canes will often collapse under snow and ice load.  The flowers are white and normally appear in a flat or slightly mounded configuration called a cyme (pictured left).  The center

of the cyme consists of fertile florets, which produce seeds and contain both anthers and a stigma.  In turn, they are ringed by sterile florets which have petals.  This type of flower arrangement is referred to as a lace-cap flower.  Lace-cap flowers are ideal where the plant is situated for close-up and personal viewing.  However, if the plant is to be viewed from afar, consider the Hortensia or mop head hydrangeas.  This group features large balls of predominantly showy sterile florets. They are called Hortensias since they occur under horticultural cultivation and very rarely in the wild.  The reduced number of fertile florets and the subsequent reduced production of seed does not permit them to be as successful at reproducing themselves as do the lace-caps!  For the gardener, the Hortensias provide a nice display, even at 60 MPH and the large balls of lacy florets provides the garden with a more harlequin appearance.  For Hydrangea arborescens, a very attractive Hortensia is ‘Annabelle’ (pictured below).  Discovered near Anna, Illinois, this plant produces large  green flowers in early June, which mature to pure white by mid-June before fading to green and finally to tan for winter.  A wonderful plant for the Garden!  Very similar in appearance is the selection named Incrediball™.  Although it is reputed that in fertile soils the flower stems of Incrediball are less likely to flop following heavy rains, I have seen both perform very admirably in the Garden.  The key of course is to amend the soils with ample amounts of compost to maintain adequate soil moisture and to avoid fertilizers, which will result in stems that collapse more readily.
Also possessing Lacecap and Hortensia shaped flowers isHydrangea macrophylla.  It is native to the warmer, coastal regions of Japan and China and consequently, it blooms on the previous year’s growth.  The plants have relatively large, glossy foliage that gave rise to the species epithet, macrophylla, meaning large leaves.  Flowers can be pink or blue, resulting from the impact of the soil pH on pigments in the flowers called Anthocyanin.  Anthocyanins change color depending upon the pH; in acid conditions it is blue, in neutral it is violet and in alkaline soils it is red or pink.  Consequently, a soil pH of 6.0-7.0 or above results in pink flowers, while pH values below 6.0 result in blue flower colors.  The flowers are produced from the terminal buds on the stems.  If these buds are desiccated by strong winter winds or if the plant is ‘sheared’ during late summer or autumn, no flowers will be produced the following summer.  Hence, it is important to select cultivars that are from a more northerly and colder native range of Asia and pruning should be conducted through the thinning of the stems, not shearing.  Pruning is best conducted during the wintermonths, following foliage drop, allowing the stems to be easily viewed.  The stems that are produced the preceding summer are cinnamon brown and should not be pruned.  The balance of the stems are light grey in color;  based upon the age of the plant, anywhere from none to 8-12 of the largest and oldest stems should be removed, promoting the production of newer canes, which will yield larger flowers!  Provide a site in full sun to partial shade and soils that are well-drained but, do not dry out frequently.  As before, the addition of compost is always beneficial.  Of the Lacecap forms available on the market, I have found ‘Blue Wave’ and ‘Tokyo Delight’ (picture above) to be very winter hardy.  As a bonus, both provide the benefit of fall color – an unusual trait for Large Leaved Hydrangeas!  Of the Hortensia types, ‘Nikko Blue’ is an old but noteworthy selection as is a more recent introduction, Endless Summer®.  Endless Summer® will actually rebloom in August and September on new branches that have sprouted from older stems.  Following the icy and prolonged winter of 2014, the canes of most Endless Summer® cultivars died to the ground and most plants failed to bloom.  It became evident that in order for flowering stems and flowers to reappear later in the season, an existing older stem needs to exist as the originator of these shoots – new shoots produced from the base do not bloom on current season’s growth!  Thus, it is best to prune Endless Summer by the thinning of old canes, just as is done with the other cultivars, and not by cutting the plant to the ground.
The remaining two Hydrangeas that are commonly used in Gardens are Hydrangea paniculata and Hydrangea quercifolia.  Both of these plants produce a white cone shaped flower called a panicle, which consists of a central stem that in turn is branched, producing a cone shaped flower. Hydrangeapaniculata, the Panicle Hydrangea is native to cold, mountainous regions of Japan and China and blooms on new wood.  Unfortunately, pruning is not as straight forward as with the Smooth Hydrangea.  Similar to the previous two species, some plants have copious amounts of sterile florets while other plants have more limited quantities.  Selections such as Hydrangea paniculata ‘Unique’ (at left)

have a more open panicle with a large number of fertile flowers.  These types of plants can be treated in several different manners:  they can be pruned back heavily, nearly to the ground; pruned moderately, leaving a 3-4′ tall framework for the new growth to grow from; or simply not pruned at all!  If the plants are pruned heavily to the ground, they respond with 5-6′ tall canes with noticeably larger flowers.  Since ‘Unique’ has less sterile florets in a panicle to catch rainwater, heavy rains will not weigh down the flower, allowing the plant to stand ‘proud’ throughout the summer.  Other plants, such as H. paniculata ‘Limelight’ (below) produce large quantities of sterile florets; if these stems are cut back severely the tall canes are not able to support the heavy panicles and will bend to the ground under the weight.  Thus, they should be cut back to a 3-4′ tall framework or not at all, which will yield a more modest 1-2′ spurt of new growth that can adequately support the flowers.  Of all the species,Hydrangea paniculata has probably seen the most activity with the release of new cultivars.  The most significant improvements focus upon selections whose flowers age from white to pink in late summer and early fall.  Traditionally, the flowers have faded to tan.  Plants such asHydrangea paniculata ‘Quick Fire’ (at right), ‘Pink Diamond’ and ‘Limelight’ present this floral color change, which not only provides extended interest, but also more potential plantcombinations in the Garden.  They look great combined with the red fall color of Itea virginica ‘Henry’s Garnet’ or the wonderful golden yellow of Amsonia hubrichtii.  Most selections of Panicle Hydrangea typically grow to between 8′ and nearly 20′ tall with time.  If this exceeds the Garden’s space allocations, there are several compact forms, including Little Lime™ and ‘Dharuma’ that grow to a more diminutive 4′ tall!
The last of the quartet of popular Garden Hydrangeas isHydrangea quercifolia, or the Oak Leaf Hydrangea.  It is native to shady, woodland regions of Georgia, Alabama and parts of Florida.  Amazingly, it is also very hardy in New Jersey!  As the name implies, the leaf shape is very reminiscent to that of an Oak and they develop fantastic fall color! Similar to Hydrangea paniculata, they also produce a panicle flower.  However, since they are native to a warmer climates, the flower is produced on previous year’s growth and – considering that these plant wish to grow from 8 to 10 tall – it is nearly impossible to keep them at a more restricted size while not removing any flowers!  At best, the plants can be lightly shaped as they will often throw a branch that disrupts the overall rounded form of the plant. Plants are best located away from buildings or other architectural entities that could be ‘eaten’ as they age, allowing them to become a perfect screen or backdrop to the garden.  If a smaller plant is of need, ‘Peewee’ and ‘Ruby Slippers’ are two selections that mature to 4′ tall.  The advantage to ‘Ruby Slippers’ is the attractive aging of the flowers as it passes from a clean white during summer to a rich red during late summer and fall – a very stunning plant!  The flowers of Peewee simply age to tan. Of the remaining selections available, ‘Snow Flake’ (picture above) is a unique plant, producing very attractive double, or hose-in-hose flowers.  It too slowly fades to red as fall approaches, with its only downside being the sheer weight of the flower. The weight produced by the extra flower petals causes the flowers to droop down, which may prove to be unattractive to some gardeners.  Amazingly drought and heat tolerant once established, Oak Leaf Hydrangea is as much at home in the sun as the shade in NJ.  It simply needs space to grow!
Hydrangeas has been one of the great staples for the Garden during the past century.  With the numerous additional selections that have been added to the list over the past 20 plus years, it is certainly guaranteed to will retain this honor throughout the next century.  The key is identifying the plants native provenance or ‘home’ as that will foretell how best to prune the plant since, as we all know, a properly pruned Hydrangea is a Happy Hydrangea!
Article written by Bruce Crawford

Director at Rutgers Gardens

 


Thank you to all of our sponsors!

 

  Our  Sponsors….
GOLD
 

  

   

SILVER

 LP STATILE ad

Brock farms logo

  PRN logo
Outdoor Lighting Perspectives
BRONZE

  

Walpole Woodworkers

 Halls Garden Center snip

Jeannie Marcucci
APLD New Jersey Chapter Writer

A Call for Submissions….
Anybody looking to submit articles or photos for future newsletters please send your questions and material to:
Jeannie Marcucci
Please, if submitting photos, please do not imbed them into the body of the word document–attach to email separately!

 

March 2015 Newsletter

March, 2015
March, 2015
March 2015 Newsletter
In This Issue
President’s Message
APLDNJ Winter Workshop
Getting Ready for Change
Curb Appeal with a Splash
Book Reviews
Winter Plants
Gardens in a Snow-free Zone
A Call for Submissions…
WELCOME
NEW MEMBERS
 

Chapter meeting/event Dates

 

 

Dates to  

Remember

 

 


Our Sponsors

 

 

 

 GOLD

  

NJ Deer Control

Bartlett Tree Experts

 

SILVER

 

 

 

  

Spring Meadow Nursery, Inc. 

BRONZE
 
    
________
 See our website for more about these sponsors…
BECOME A MEMBER

President’s Message 

In 2008 I joined APLDNJ and saw my world explode.  I soon realized I had become a member of a very talented and exceedingly generous group of landscape designers.  Within months I was attending national conferences and meeting and learning from members across the country and across the puddle.  At conferences I was meeting the authors who inspired and influenced my work. Now, after receiving so much, I am excited to give back to this organization.

As President of the APLDNJ Chapter I have two main goals.  The first is to reach out and include all of our members throughout the state. When I read through the roster I realize there are many members I haven’t had the pleasure of meeting.  This year we are going to stage events throughout the state to excite, inspire, educate and elevate the individual designers as well as the trade.  We have a Sketch Up workshop scheduled for March 12th at the County College of Morris with Bill Einhorn, landscape architect and instructor at the NY Botanical Garden.  If you’ve ever had a client who struggled to interpret a plan view you will appreciate the benefit of being able to offer a 3-D illustration.  In addition we are putting together private garden tours throughout NJ as well visits to iconic gardens in the NYC area.

Next year, the APLDNJ Chapter celebrates its 10th anniversary and talks of a gala celebration are beginning.  My second aspiration is to attract more student members.  APLD can be such a resource and source of inspiration to the next wave of top NJ Landscape Designers.  They can also bring new paradigms and perspective as we reconsider our roles in the landscape.

Most of all, I want all members, present and future, to participate in all this organization has to offer. There are many ways to be involved and I’d like everyone to have a voice.  If you have an idea, share it. If you want to see something happen, tell me.  If you know something great is going on, let me know. It’s your organization and I want it to be as dynamic as we all are. Thank you for this opportunity.  I can be reached at hggardendesign@gmail.com or 908 285-1281.

Most sincerely,

Helen Grundmann


APLDNJ WORKSHOP

APLDNJ’s Annual 

Winter Workshop 

Held on 

Thursday, March 12, 2015

SketchUp Bootcamp with 

Bill Einhorn, APLD, RLA

 

In this sold-out workshop, APLDNJ members…

 


Getting Ready for Change

APLD restructures membership categories and requirements starting in 2016.

Background

Since its inception in 1989, APLD has represented professional landscape designers on many fronts, including in the legislative and advocacy arenas. In recent years, regulations have increased in many professions, and landscape design is no exception. An ad hoc task force was created to address raising the level of professionalism within the APLD membership to enable better representation of the profession with regulatory bodies. After
two years of study, a final recommendation was made to and approved by the APLD Board of Directors in November 2014.

Course of Action

The approved changes will restructure all membership categories and requirements. This restructure defines all levels of membership and outlines specific professional requirements for each category including levels of education, professional documentation, years of experience and a commitment to continuing education. A synopsis of the new categories of membership and requirements can be found here.
These changes will take effect for the January 2016 renewal period, so you have a full year to prepare!

Next Steps

There are several things you can do to ready yourself for the upcoming changes:

1. Identify your category of membership and determine the education and documents you will need to gather.

2. Look at the CEU requirements for your membership level and start planning for your continued professional development.

3. Review the certification requirements, if you are eligible, and start planning to attain this status of membership in 2015.

4. Pay attention over the next few months to the Design Online
and eblasts for more specific information as well as a description of each new membership category.

APLD is committed to advancing the profession of landscape design through higher professional standards, and the membership initiative underscores that commitment.

How to integrate the beauty of a water feature into your design.
…by Jennifer Zuri of Aquascapes, Inc.
Provided by Mike Gannon of Full Service Aquatics


Two Good Books

Like many people, I love to eat great food! I also love to grow it.  When a friend gave me the book American Terroir by Rowan Jacobsen, it  struck a chord with me. This book combines the history, mystery and science of why the “taste of a place” comes from the soil and climate of the region.  His informative and often hysterical guide to some of our most iconic foods-including apples, honey, maple syrup, coffee, oysters, salmon, wild mushrooms, wine, cheese and chocolate- also includes recipes!  And if you’re the kind of foodie that travels to find the best, you will especially love this book.

Coincidently, another friend passed along the book The Town That Food Saved by Ben Hewitt. It tells how one community found vitality in local food. In the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont sits the rural town of Hardwick. For generations dairy farmers made up the life blood of the community. As American milk consumption declined so did the town. Then a new generation of farmers with a new way of thinking took things on.  This goes beyond farmer’s markets and includes entrepreneurs, activists and artisans.  You may recognize some of the players: High Mowing Organic Seeds, Vermont Soy, Buffalo Mountain Food Co-op, Vermont Soy and Jasper Hill Farm to name a few. This goes beyond farmer’s markets and includes entrepreneurs, activists and artisans.

Reviewed by Helen Grundmann, APLD

 

Small is the New Big
Provided by Proven Winners

 

Ferns: A Leafy Lifecycle

As we have been illustrating over the past few months, leaves are a fascinating part of plants.  Initially, tasked with the job of producing carbohydrates that in turn provide the building blocks for the growth of roots, stems and branches, the leaves of some plants took on additional challenges. An example is a common garden plant whose complicated, albeit very successful, life cycle is all about leaves: the ferns!
Ferns are vascular plants, meaning that unlike some of the other more primitive plants, they have the appropriate plumbing to move water and nutrients throughout the plant.  Ferns originally started to develop around 350 Million Years Ago (MYA) during the early Carboniferous period, but the ferns we recognize today did not start to appear until around 290 MYA with the advent of

the Osmun

dales family, represented in NJ gardens by Royal and Cinnamon Ferns (Osmunda regalis and Osmunda cinnamomearespectively, Osmunda regalis is picture at left). Interestingly, ferns did not stop developing at that point in time, but continued over the millennia.  In fact, many ferns appeared after 145 MYA and are a contemporary of the true flowering plants or Angiosperms. Examples include the Lady and Maidenhair Ferns (Athyriumfilix-femina and Adiantum pedatum respectively).  For 250 million years ferns were slowly changing!  Regardless of the changes, their life cycle was and remains highly dependent upon leaves!

Fern leaves, which are often called fronds, can be simple in form, meaning that they are unlobbed, much like the Birds Nest Fern (Asplenium nidus, pictured at right) or highly lobbed forms such as the aforementioned Royal Fern (Osmunda regalis). The individual leaflets of these highly lobbed or compound leaves ae called pinnae.  Similar to the more advanced leaves of the flowering plants or Angiosperms, fern leaves possess a mesophyll, which contains the chloroplasts and is the site of photosynthesis; they have an epidermal layer complete withstomata and guard cells on the lower surface, allowing theexchange of gasses within the leaf; and they have a waxy cuticle layer covering the epidermis,reducing water loss. The fronds emerge from buds, typically found at the tips of thestems. The stems typically lie horizontally just below the ground and are called a rhizome. However, members of the genus Cyathea or tree ferns have vertical stems.  When the fronds make their initial appearance, they resemble the scrollat the tip of a fiddle’s fingerboard or the top of a bishop’s staff, affectionately giving rise to their commonly used names of fiddleheads or crosiers.  For some ferns, such as the Ostrich Fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris), the fiddleheads are actually an edible delicacy and when lightly sautéed, provide a taste and texture much like asparagus. The uncurling and expansion of the fiddleheads is called circinate vernation, whereby the cells on the outer surface of the crosier expand faster than the cells on the inner surface, allowing the leaf to literally unroll!
What is not blatantly obvious from a casual study of a fern is how the life cycle is directly connected with three different types of leaves:  namely the  Trophophylls, Sporophylls and the leafy prothallus.  The first two types of leaves appear during the sporophytic or spore producing portion of a fern’s life cycle, while the prothallus appears during the gamaphytic or gamete producing stage  A trophophyll is the traditional fern frond, whose primary function is that of photosynthesis.  The sporophyll is a modified leaf that produces spores. This leaf can assume the shape and photosynthetic function of a trophophyll, with the only perceivable difference being the appearance of very organized rows of dark brown specks beneath the frond (those of

Asplenium nidus pictured at left).   Many people mistake these specs for a very organized insect or scale infestation!  In reality, these spots are actually sori (sorus for singular), which in turn contain clusters of sporangia, the organelles that actuallyproduce the spores!  Sporophylls can also appear uniquely different than a trophophyll – typically smaller and narrower – with the only function being to produce spores!  Examples include the Ostrich Fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris, pictured at the right) and the Sensitive Fern (Onoclea sensiblis). Due to their shorter stature, they may not be particularly noticeable throughout the growing season.  However, since they fail to collapse following autumn frosts and persist through the winter as bolt upright, dark brown structures, they provide a little winter interest and aid with winter plant identification! Regardless of the form assumed by the sporophylls, their primary function is that of spore production.  In many aspects, spores serve a function similar to seeds, allowing the plant to spread to new locations that might be conducive for the plant to grow.  What is different is how spores and seeds are created. Spores are produced through cell division within the sporangia. Each sporangium typically produces 64 spores, beginning with a diploid ‘mother’ cell which has the normal set of two chromosomes. This cell divides through the process of mitosis, which creates two identical ‘daughter’ cells. These two daughter cells continue todivide, until there are 16 daughter cells. These cells then each undergo the process of Meiosis, through which each cell divides twice to create 4 genetically unique or different haploid cells.  A haploid cell only has 1 set of chromosomes. Since each of the original 16 spores underwent meiosis, a total of 64 haploid cells result, each of which will ultimately become a spore. By contrast, a seed is the result of the sexual merger of two haploid cells – one ‘male’ and one ‘female’ – along with the merger of the DNA information that each cell contains to create a diploid!

 

When the spores are mature, they are released from the sporangia.  The time of year for spore release varies remarkably between the genera.  Many are released in late summer, but for both the Ostrich and Sensitive Fern, with their sporophylls remaining bolt upright through winter, spore release is not until spring!  Spores are very small, each measuring about 1/10 of a mm in diameter and resemble dust.  As a fun experiment, once the spores are mature, the sporophylls can be cut, flattened atop a white sheet of paper such that the sori are facing down and then left overnight to dry. The next day, the red, brown, yellow or even green spores can be seen on the paper.  For other ferns such as the Staghorn Ferns, simply tapping the tops of the sporophylls when the spores are ripe will release a cloud of spores that can be collected. When the moisture and light conditions are proper, the thick and protective cell walls surrounding the spore will split open and the spore will ‘germinate’.  Spore germination involves the haploid cell dividing via the process of mitosis, yielding two identical haploid, cells, which in turn continue to divide mitotically until a haploid, leafy prothallus results. This marks the beginning of the gametophytic stage.
One might wonder what advantage there would be to a haploid gametophytic stage and such a seemingly complicated life cycle.  In diploids, the dominate genes of one chromosome may mask a potentially hazardous recessive gene of the second chromosome, which would continue to be transferred to its offspring.  When a portion of a life cycle is haploid, there is no possibility for a dangerous or life threatening gene to be masked and transmitted, since it would be overt from the beginning and the haploid organism would perish!

The prothallus is typically heart-shaped in appearance (as seen on the left, Source: Random Tree on Wikipedia [CC License]) and since it is non-vascular, it is small, roughly the size of a child’s fingernail. Most often they are free living organisms, being green in color and conduct photosynthesis.  However, in some fern species the prothallus lack chloroplasts and the carbon and other nutrients are obtained from symbiotic relationships with fungi.  The center of the prothallus is several cells thick, but along theperiphery, it is often a mere one cell thick. Interestingly, as many gardeners in deer country have observed, very few insects or animals eat ferns, but nearly every critter eats the prothallus, which in part, explains why they are not seen more readily in the wild!  The prothallus produces tiny rhizoids or root like structures on its lower surface (as can be seen above), allowing it to anchor itself to substrates. The lower surface is also the site where the male and female structures are produced. The antheridia

(singular antheridium) are ball shaped organs that are the site of the male gametophyte or sperm production; they are typically located near the periphery of the prothallus. Unlike most mosses that have one flagella or ‘tail’, fern sperm are multiflagellated, with some having upwards of 100 flagella! The flask shaped archegonia (singular archegonium) are the site of the ovum production and occur along the central portion of the leaf.  Most often, but not always, both the male and female structures are located on the same prothallus  In the presence of water, the multiflagellated sperm literally swim to the ovum, apparently attracted by Malic Acid and other chemicals. HOWEVER, it is rare that the sperm fertilizes the ovum of the same prothallus; since all the cells of a prothallus are haploid and contain identical genetic information that would prevent the blending of genetic information and essentially create ‘inbreeding’. Ferns accomplish crossbreeding through the archegonia and antheridia maturing at different times on any given prothallus, a technique which has been mimicked in many of the early angiosperms (flowering plants) or failing to have both on the same prothallus.  Given this fact, it becomes far more obvious as to why water and the large number of flagella are necessary since they have some significant ground to cover if the outcome is to be met with success!  Once an ovum has been fertilized, the other archegonium essentially ‘shut down’, allowing only one fern to be produced per prothallus. The enlarging embryo initially receives all its nutrition from the prothallus.  As with seeds, the first organelle to develop and emerge is the embryonic root, which allows the developing fern to begin the process of becoming self-sufficient. The fern or sporophytic stage grows rapidly and quickly becoming an independent plant, and since the prothallus is no longer needed, it degrades and vanishes.
Ferns are wonderful additions for every garden, providing a texture and color that many other plants simply cannot replicate.  However, as you look at your ferns this coming year, marvel at the complexity of their leafy life cycle and how many have survived the changing climate of the Earth for millions upon millions of years!

 

Article written by Bruce Crawford

Director at Rutgers Gardens

 


Gardens and Travel to a Snow-Free Zone

For those of us that love gardening and maintaining a beautiful landscape and garden, turn to east for inspiration:

Vietnam and Cambodia are in growthmode both economically and horticulturally. Large buildings are growing as quickly as rice thanks to foreign investments from China and European countries. Telephone and internet service wires create intricate, large nests on city utility poles. Lush plants need to be controlled – either eat it, prune it or reuse it. Nothing is wasted.
During our January travels we saw few remains of Frenchinfluence in plantings. Topiaries are seen at the formal buildings such as the Royal Palace in Phnom Penh, Ho Chi Minh’s official home in Hanoi or at important shines and temples.  Beautiful 19thcentury opera houses, post offices, and churches are clustered in Hanoi and Saigon city centers.  All government buildings are painted a golden yellow, the powerful color of rulers.
City dwellers have little space aside from vegetable gardens so they fill balconies with flowering plants; boat dwellers prominently display fresh flowers.  An afternoon at the zoological and botanical garden in Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon) provided examples of good intentions where money is short supply.  Amazingly, hundreds of common annuals were growing in brown plastic #1 pots along fences and inside low hedges.
Flowers are purchased at the start of each lunar month for shrine and temple offerings in memory of ancestors. In Cambodia where lotuses grow like weeds, blooms are displayed with peeledand folded petals.
Hanoi, a lovely city, has many parks which are fully used- Tai Chi in the morning, badminton, hacky sac playing, evening strolls, and by endless young couples posing for wedding album photos.
Brides, and their stylists, are everywhere in white, western gowns which are rented for photos; marriages are performed with brides in traditional dress.
Education is valued highly and that value is instilled in childrenfrom an early age by stories. They are encouraged to strive to become dragons as in the section of this story: ” Undeterred, the koi continued their efforts for one hundred years. At last, with one heroic leap, a single koi reached the top of the falls. The God’s smiled down in approval and transformed the exhausted koi into a shining golden dragon. He joyfully spends his days chasing pearls of wisdom across the skies of the vast and eternal heavens. The falls have become know as the Dragon’s Gate and, because of their endurance and perseverance, koi have become symbolic of overcoming adversity and fulfilling one’s destiny, symbolic of worldly aspiration and advancement.”
Angkor Wat, Anglor Thom and Ta Prohm are worth googling or viewing on YouTube.
A 27 hour layover in Hong Kong was fabulous – but was not long enough to visit their beautiful parks.   A step inside one showed many plants familiar to zone 6 gardens.
I look forward to more time in SE Asia!
Submitted by Jane Derickson

 

As the New Year begins we want to thank all of our Sponsors for their support in 2014
.

 

Our  Sponsors….

GOLD 

  

   

SILVER  

 LP STATILE ad

Brock farms logo

  PRN logo
Outdoor Lighting Perspectives
BRONZE

  

Walpole Woodworkers

 Halls Garden Center snip

Jeannie Marcucci
APLD New Jersey Chapter Writer

A Call for Submissions….
Anybody looking to submit articles or photos for future newsletters please send your questions and material to:
Jeannie Marcucci

 

 

January, 2015 Newsletter

 

January, 2015
January, 2015
APLD NJ Newsletter
In This Issue
New Year Review
APLDNJ Winter Workshop
Getting Ready for Change
The Use of Water Elements
Plant of the Month
Deer Control ???
A Call for Submissions…
WELCOME
NEW MEMBERS
 

Chapter meeting/event Dates

 

 

Dates to  

Remember

 

 


Our Sponsors

 

 

 

 GOLD

  

NJ Deer Control

 

SILVER

 

 

 

  
BRONZE
    
________
 See our website for more about these sponsors…
BECOME A MEMBER

Happy New Year! 
 

And so another year begins. Whenever one looks back it seems that time passes so quickly.

2014 was another successful year for the APLDNJ Chapter. Besides having our booth at the NJNLA PLANTS show and the NJ Flower and Garden show (both held in Edison) we also had a booth at the NJ Patio, Flower and Home show (held at the Morristown Armory) In April we had our 4th annual Sponsor MEET and GREET event. In May we participated for the first time in the Mansion in May event at Blairsden in Peapack.

We met in June at the Garden Cottage  in Morristown for an evening event and learned new things about outdoor furniture and firepits and how we might implement these things in our designs. We tried to hold a CAD workshop in July – must have been too hot because we had to cancel that one due to low registration.

In August we participated in the NJNLA Summer Symposium. This year was particular interesting as the day included several garden tours in Princeton, a tour of Pleasant Run Nursery which included lunch and the final stop at Rutgers Gardens for a barbeque dinner and presentation by keynote speaker Vincent Simeone. We view this event as our August meeting and without fail it is always a great day.

A 2 day Long Island garden tour was held in September. There are definitely some beautiful public and private gardens in Long Island!

We gathered for an event in October at Mike Gannon’s house in Summit. He explained the features of his own pond and showed us many other beautiful ponds in a photo presentation. Mike is the owner of Full Service Aquatics. He became a Gold sponsor to the APLDNJ Chapter in April, 2014.

The APLD International Conference was held in Orlando, Florida on November 4 – 7. A three day event with speakers, garden tours and a gigantic trade show. This conference was held in conjunction with with the 2014 International Pool, Spa and Patio Expo.

And so – full circle – we are back to where we started. The NJ Plants show is less than 3 weeks away. We are getting ready – are you?

APLDNJ WORKSHOP

APLDNJ’s Annual 

Winter Workshop

 

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

SketchUp Bootcamp with 

Bill Einhorn, APLD, RLA

 

Get a solid introduction to SketchUp or just brush up your skills. In addition to being     President of APLD’s NY Chapter and running a busy design/build practice, Bill Einhorn teaches SketchUp regularly at the New York Botanical Garden and we have him for the entire day!

Selling your design vision depends on how well you can communicate your intent to a client. 3D imaging has become an industry standard and SketchUp is the go-to tool to create those images. Best of all it’s free!

The workshop will be taught in the state of the art design studio in the new LEED Gold certified Landscape and Horticultural Technology building at County College of Morris and will be limited to 20 participants, lunch will be served.

Watch your email box for more information and how to sign up after the New Year!

 


Getting Ready for Change

APLD restructures membership categories and requirements starting in 2016.

Background

Since its inception in 1989, APLD has represented professional landscape designers on many fronts, including in the legislative and advocacy arenas. In recent years, regulations have increased in many professions, and landscape design is no exception. An ad hoc task force was created to address raising the level of professionalism within the APLD membership to enable better representation of the profession with regulatory bodies. After

two years of study, a final recommendation was made to and approved by the APLD Board of Directors in November 2014.

Course of Action

The approved changes will restructure all membership categories and requirements. This restructure defines all levels of membership and outlines specific professional requirements for each category including levels of education, professional documentation, years of experience and a commitment to continuing education. A synopsis of the new categories of membership and requirements can be found here.

These changes will take effect for the January 2016 renewal period, so you have a full year to prepare!

Next Steps

There are several things you can do to ready yourself for the upcoming changes:

1. Identify your category of membership and determine the education and documents you will need to gather.

2. Look at the CEU requirements for your membership level and start planning for your continued professional development.

3. Review the certification requirements, if you are eligible, and start planning to attain this status of membership in 2015.

4. Pay attention over the next few months to the Design Online

and eblasts for more specific information as well as a description of each new membership category.

APLD is committed to advancing the profession of landscape design through higher professional standards, and the membership initiative underscores that commitment.


Using Water Elements 
 in Today’s Landscapes

Design it, Build it, or Work with an Installer?

Professional landscape design is a challenging and dynamic field. Each project having very unique design aspects that vary from client to client. Each passing year will bring new design trends from the industry and new desires from your clients. The job of a professional landscape designer requires an awareness and an ability to respond to industry trends and client demands. It is not always easy keeping up with modern design approaches and often times will require keeping your ear to the ground in
anticipation of what the industry will bring.
Water features in the landscape are not anything new, and have
actually been with us since antiquity. How we approach water feature design however; is always changing. In today’s landscape designs water features such as koi ponds, water gardens, waterfalls, etc. have kept a slow but steady upward growth trend; especially with the advent of much easier equipment to use and much better long term results on finished products. For the professional landscape designer who is keeping their ear to the ground a massive shift in landscape design can clearly be heard! Are you ready for this? Is your company and crew ready for this?
If your company is not prepared, well start getting ready. Water
features of all types are about to become very trendy and very much in demand; and your company should have a plan to respond to the demand. Why is this new demand coming about? TV. Yes, TV, which has helped the landscape industry tremendously in the past with TV show after TV show geared toward backyard renovations and outdoor living. TV has helped create a demand for better functioning and more creative landscape designs. The landscape professional owes a lot to
the awareness that this type of programming has done for the
industry. And now some new programming is already prime time and making an impact on your customers. Water features used to be a side show for the landscape TV genre, but
now they are becoming front and center with several new shows on the market, and new shows in development that are making the water feature in the landscape front and center. Water features are becoming their very own genre of TV and you need to be prepared for the new demand for water features that will come with this exposure to the masses.
So now is the time to spend money on all new marketing, retrain your crews, buy new equipment, learn how to properly install every type of water feature, learn about fish, learn about aquatic plants, learn about controlling water quality, train new service techs, and wade through all the junk equipment on the market and find out what really works. You have a TON of work ahead of you! …or do you? Maybe it is better to not go through the growing pains, time, and investments needed to become proficient and profitable at installing water features for your clients. Maybe the time, expense, and learning curves can be eliminated and you can jump right into offering water features for your clients and being profitable at it. How can this be
done? How can the landscape design professional get up to speed right away?
Why not turn to an established water feature professional and develop a working relationship with them? Did you know there are companies who strictly specialize in water gardens, koi ponds, waterfall displays, and water features; with fully trained installers? Did you know many of these companies would love to connect with a landscape designer to help improve and grow BOTH parties businesses? As the owner of Full Service Aquatics, a water feature specialty company in New Jersey, I know of companies across America who would jump at the opportunity to become YOUR installer. Trained, experienced, and certified water feature companies have always strove to develop mutually beneficial and profitable relationships with landscape designers; and with the oncoming new demand for these type of projects now more than ever they’d love to connect with your company.
Teaming up with a pond and water feature professional will save your company money while bringing in a new revenue stream; and that is the bottom line. The traditional method of hiring/firing, training, teaching, buying equipment, and all other associated expenses for your company can easily be, and should be, avoided. Teaming up with a water feature professional is a quick and easy way for your company to jump right into satisfied customers and profitable projects. This day and age, and with these market conditions, why would you do it any differently!
Get your company’s feet wet with water features, develop your blue thumb, and don’t miss out on the opportunities that
are coming your way in the very near future! Ponds, water gardens, and water features are about to become VERY trendy, don’t be left high and dry!
For more information on Water Features and your business contact:
Mike Gannon
Full Service Aquatics at 908-277-6000 or email at


PLANT OF THE MONTH: JANUARY

Bergenia: A Colorful Winter Squeak!

 

Avid gardeners have long realized that a ‘Garden’ is not merely a ‘warm-weather’ friend whose interest fades with the onset of colder weather. Much to the contrary, winter can provide an entirely unique and beautiful display of colors and textures, untold in any other season. The challenge is conveying that message to the general gardening public, who consider winter to be that ‘non-gardening’ season. Fortunately, there are a number of plants that provide interest during the frenzied season of springtime buying that, unbeknownst to the buyer, have garden interest far beyond spring. Pigsqueak or Bergenia is one of these fun plants that many purchase in April for the flowers, only to learn of its benefits come the winter solstice!

 

Bergenia

is a member of the Saxifrage family, a group of approximately 440 species of plants, typically found in rocky, almost alpine conditions. The name Bergenia was coined in 1794 by the Professor Conrad Moench (1744-1805) of the Marlburg University in Germany, honoring a fellow German Botanist and Physician, Karl August von Bergen (1704-1759). Of course, nothing is ever clearly defined with plants, especially before rapid communication; in 1821, the English botanist Adrian Hardy Haworth (1767-1833) named the genus Megasea from the Greek Megas for large. The leaves of Bergenia are typically very large and coarse, prompting Hawsorth to script this name that even to this day is occasionally seen. The plant’s common name of Pigsqueak is far more entertaining, since when the large rubbery leaves are rubbed together, they produce a squeal very reminiscent of a pig’s squeak!

 

    

 

Most Bergenia species inhabit the colder regions of western Asia. Originating from Siberia and Mongolia,

Bergenia cordifolia
has heart-shaped or cordate foliage, which ironically Adrian Haworth originally named
Saxafraga cordifolia! The heart-shaped leaves grow upwards of 10″ tall and 8″ across. As is typical of the genus, Bergenia cordifolia spreads slowly via a thick rhizomatous root system, allowing the plant to develop into a dense, weed suppressing colony. The bell-shaped flowers appear in colors of white, pink or red, depending upon the seedling and are displayed along a branched spike which stretches to 8″ above the foliage. The foliage remains green throughout the growing season, but with the advent of winter, it assumes shades of deep red and amber! Native to the Eastern Himalayas and Western China, Bergenia purpurascens is very similar in appearance, although the flowers are purplish red to pink. Throughout the summer, the leaves have hints of purple which intensify into strong reds and deep purples come winter. The crosses made between these two species come under the designation of Bergenia x smithii, as named in 1930 by Heinrich Gustav Adolf Engler. A selection of B. x smithii available for NJ gardens is the dark pink flowered form named ‘Bressingham Ruby’. The foliage forms dense mats to 12″ that is dark green in summer with glowing shades of red come winter. It looks stunning when combined with Red-Stemmed Dogwood or Willows! ‘Bressingham White’ has similar winter foliage but with white flowers in April.

 

  

 

Another fun species for the garden is

Bergenia ciliata. Native to Afghanistan and Western Pakistan, it is deciduous and consequently has no winter interest. Come April, it reawakens with light pink flowers followed by foliage that once again takes center stage, as the hairy or cilieate leaves grow to an impressive paddle-like size of 12″tall by 12″ wide. A bold textured plant indeed!

Pigsqueaks perform well in moist, well-drained soils and prefer light shade. In their native haunts, they grow in areas shaded by large rocks or on shady rocky bluffs. However, they are tolerant of a wide range of soil types and pH’s and can endure full sun in moister soils. Maintenance is low, as the new foliage of spring arches up and over the fading foliage of the year prior, eliminating the need to remove older foliage. Division is needed every 5-8 years. It should also be planted where the gardener can touch the thick waxy foliage and produce that delightful squeak – after all, we winter gardeners delight in more than just color alone!

Article written by Bruce Crawford

Director at Rutgers Gardens

 


DEER CONTROL ???????
“You have deer in New Jersey?”… How many times have you been in that conversation outside of our state? Of course the answer is yes, in fact there are so many deer that they actually pose a problem in more places than not! So, not only are we the most densely populated state in the US, but we have one of the most dense deer populations as well! The variables to this equation are adding up to trouble for many residents of our beautiful garden state!
Ironically, just over a hundred years ago there were hardly any white-tailed deer in the state. Hunting and lack of proper habitat had severely limited their numbers, but now that is not the case. There are two major changes to the deer’s environment that have caused this dramatic population change.
First, deer are an “edge species”, which means they thrive in habitat that has wooded borders next to fields or open spaces. New Jersey used to be made up of larger, homogenous tracts of land that were rapidly subdivided over and over again, which, in turn, created the plethora of “edge” habitat we have today. Second, our state’s largest herbivore has thrived from the lack of any natural predators, which were quickly extirpated as our human population grew. (Now, if we could only re-introduce wolves and mountain lions…). So now you can see we have ourselves to blame for creating the perfect scenario for deer to flourish!
For those of us that love gardening and maintaining a beautiful landscape, deer are an issue on many levels. Not only are they a very mobile animal, but they can jump eight foot fences! In addition, their physiology allows them to digest different food materials at different times of the year. This is a natural survival adaptation, and the reason why they leave your yews and arborvitae alone in the summer, yet thrive on these evergreens in the winter. The enzymes in their stomachs change to allow digestion and retrieval of nutrients from these harder materials; a useful adaptation during harsh winters when food is often scarce.
Deer have wreaked havoc on our natural, agricultural and landscaped worlds. Farmers are constantly battling deer to save their crops, and extensive overgrazing of our forests’ undergrowth often threatens the integrity and existence of our native flora and fauna.
I would bet that everybody reading this article has seen the effects of deer in our natural and landscaped surroundings. Have you ever seen a row of arborvitae that looked like popsicles on a stick? Or maybe you’ve gone to bed one night after seeing a beautiful bed of tulips and woken up to a depressing bed of flowerless stems? At the very least you have been witness to a once lush hosta, eaten nearly to the ground, doomed to live the rest of the season looking like a patch of celery stalks. Now before you get angry, remember, we all helped create this problem. These cute creatures are just trying to survive, like all wild animals, in a world that is constantly shrinking in on them.
Why combat the deer at all? For many homeowners the answer is obvious. Residents often invest large amounts of money to enhance their property with striking landscapes. Unfortunately, a small number of deer can cause thousands of dollars worth of damage in just one night. With the price of plants, shrubs, and trees always on the rise, protecting your investment is, in essence, like having an insurance policy on your landscaping. Furthermore, it will help provide the homeowner with some peace of mind by eliminating the mental anguish of looking at a damaged landscape on a daily basis.”
So what’s the solution? Well, there are many options, often with varying degrees of success. Some of the classic “home remedies” include human hair, soap, eggs, hot peppers, garlic and more. Another is a planting strategy where deer-resistant plants (a list growing shorter every year) are planted on the perimeter with more desirable plants on the interior. Deer netting is another option; but often the result is unsightly, and I have personally witnessed deer pushing through or breaking into the netting. They can be pretty determined and crafty animals!
Want a fool-proof plan? A permanent 9-foot fence surrounding your property, with small vertical grates, is sure to do the trick. The downside is fences are very expensive and restricted by ordinances in many townships. Another option is the many sprays and granulars available at nurseries, gardening supply stores and even Home Depot. Their downsides often include foul smell, ineffectiveness, lack of weather resistance and the limited ability of the homeowner to stay on top of the scheduled applications.

Last but not least, there are a number of companies that provide deer repellent spraying services, but very few that only specialize in deer repellent.Some are very professional, possessing a wealth of knowledge about their product, spraying strategies, and most importantly the habits and lifestyles of deer. Regardless of who you hire, it’s very important that your property be kept on a strict spraying schedule. So buyer beware because there is no substitute for experience and expertise in this business!

Editors note: Chris Markham is a wildlife biologist and has been in the deer repellent business for almost 10 years. He is co-owner of New Jersey Deer Control and he and his team of experts use a natural repellent that he invented and patented. For information on their statewide deer repellent spraying service, call 732-995-7264 or visit them at

www.njdeercontrol.com


As the New Year begins we want to thank all of our Sponsors for their support in 2014
.

 

Our  Sponsors….

GOLD 

     

 

SILVER

LP STATILE ad

 

Brock farms logo

  PRN logo

  

Walpole Woodworkers

 Halls Garden Center snip

 

Jeannie Marcucci
APLD New Jersey Chapter Writer

A Call for Submissions….
 
Anybody looking to submit articles or photos for future newsletters please send your questions and material to:
 
Jeannie Marcucci

 

March 2014 Newsletter

March 2014
APLD NJ Newsletter
In This Issue
President’s Message
New Event
Greenwoods Garden Tour
From Our Winter Workshop
Book Reviews
Beauty of Bulbs
A Call for Submissions…
Chapter meeting/event Dates

 

 April 8 – Sponsor Meet & Greet

June 18, reception at Cottage Garden

Sept. 2014 two days visiting gardens and nurseries on Long Island

 

TBD

Wicki Stone

TBD

Pa. Day

Hopensack & Keller

Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve

Dates to Remember
April 8

June 18

watch for more specifics

 


Our Sponsors

 

 

 

SILVER

 

 

 

 

  
BRONZE
________
 See our website for more about these sponsors…
BECOME A MEMBER
JOIN TODAY

President’s Message
 
APLDNJ is honored to be one of a very few chosen to install a garden at the 2014 Mansion in May. Blairsden in Peapack. Check this link for descriptions and photos:  www.mansioninmay.org
Thank you to those who have offered help! We do need more volunteers  - to help lay sod and stone, plant small plants, and to be an APLD presence to greet visitors and talk about what we do.  Please watch for scheduling emails. The install has to be completed by 6PM, April 22 for preview parties, the press, etc. The show house is open every day in May.  62,000 square feet of house plus gardens will be visited by an estimated 27,000 people.  What’s the benefit? You, and your ability to create opportunity. Bring your business cards.
Continued thanks to Helen Grundmann, Jock Lewenden and Suzanne Bergeron who contributed so much effort to the success of the annual APLDNJ workshop day.
We have more events in the planning stages:
1) Sponsor Meet and Greet with a presenter from HOUZZ.  RSVP required.  Contractors may be invited as guests.  We need their names. Tues, April 8. Short Hills.
2) Cottage Garden, June 18.
3) Wicki Stone visit – TBD
4) Long Island visit garden and nursery – two mid September days
Your ideas are welcomed and encouraged.
Our Chapter board needs a refresh – A Secretary, and in 2015 a Treasurer, a President, a VP, and members to take on other roles.   Being part of this board is fun; it involves contributing time, and it is also about taking turns. Please consider giving a packet of time – bunches of you can each give a bit to make a lot.  APLDNJ is worth it.  Call me!
Wishing you each a banner 2014!
Jane
Jane Derickson-Friar
_________________________________________________

EVENT!

 

To all APLD NJ Chapter Members and their Guests

Our 4th annual “Sponsor Meet and Greet” event will be onTuesday, 6 to 9PM,  April 8th.

 

In order to show our appreciation to our sponsors for their support in 2013  and for their benefit as well as ours, we have changed the format a bit.

 

We have arranged for a 30 to 45 minute presentation from a representative from HOUZZ. Some of you may have heard of HOUZZ – for those that haven’t just click click here to take a peek! http://www.houzz.com

 

We think this presentation will be beneficial to everybody in the audience.  We received favorable feedback on this idea from just about everyone we spoke with. So we hope you are as excited about this evening as we are!

We will have our “social hour” for our members to mingle with all of the sponsors at their designated tables. We will be providing light snacks along with wine, beer, soda and water. Instead of having each sponsor do a short speech about their product, we will formally introduce all of them.

We look forward to welcoming our new  sponsors of 2014: New Jersey Deer Control, and Condurso’s Nursery.

 

We have also invited contractors among other guests. Many of our members who are ‘design only’ look to hook up with a good installer. Our hope is that these contractors/installers might also become our sponsors or new members.

 

This year’s event will be held in the Parish Hall at Christ Church, 66 Highland Ave., Short Hills – the same place as last year.
Hopefully everyone will be attending again this year. We have already started making arrangements and need to know ASAP whether or not you are planning to attend.

 

Thank you once again.

Jane Derickson-Friar

APLDNJ Chapter President

 

Beth Riley

Sponsorship Chair

 

Send your reply back to:   janederick@yahoo.com

Greenwoods Garden Tour by APLD-NJ members
On a clear, brisk fall evening, eight members of the APLD-NJ met to enjoy the delights of the both the new and ongoing renovations of the historic Greenwood Gardens in Short Hills, NJ.  Over the last century, the property was owned, and loved, by two very different families, which is evident in the gardens themselves.  The self-made multi-millionaire Joseph P. Day established the gardens as a private pleasure ground for his large family. His architect, William Whetten Renwick, laid out the garden on strict axes, divided into garden rooms bound by stone walls.  He created garden beds that were full of lush annuals and perennials, and the landscape was punctuated by stone teahouses, pergolas, reflecting pools, grottoes, and terraces. The Days sold the property, after which followed several years of decline.  In the 1950s, Peter P. Blanchard, Jr., a lawyer and gentleman farmer, and his wife Adelaide Childs Frick, a pediatrician, purchased the property and added to the Days’ landscape an overlay of evergreen formality and whimsical sculptural ornamentation.  In 2000, heirs to the property began the process of establishing Greenwood Gardens as a nonprofit conservation organization, reaching out for guidance to the Garden Conservancy, a national organization based in Cold Spring, New York. Greenwood Gardens is now one of 16 exceptional gardens in the country endorsed by the Garden Conservancy.

Several pieces of the original gardens have been renovated and recently reopened to the public, including the forecourt of the main house along with garden terraces to the rear.  These rear terraces overlook three terraced gardens, as well as a staggering view of the vast preserve of forest and meadow surrounding the property.  Talk about your ‘long view’!  Greenwood Gardens is a contemporary garden rooted in the Arts & Crafts and Classical approaches to garden design, with Italianate garden terraces, grottoes, meandering moss-covered paths, allées of sycamore and spruces, ornamental trees and shrubs, and wildflower meadows, among other features, occupying over 28 acres. Our walk encompassed the Tea House, the statuary that fills the walkways and nooks, the Garden of the Zodiac, and more.  There are many interesting cultivars of plants being used which are purported to be low maintenance and high performance, part of the Gardens ongoing efforts.

We left with the setting of the sun, as deep shadows filled the walkways.  We retreated to The Boxcar, Short Hills’ renovated train station, for some burgers and libations.  An enjoyable evening over all!

Provided by Susan Bergeron

Winter Workshop
Great event held at Frelinghuysen Arboretum on Thursday, February 27, 2014
The day started with a meadow presentation by Larry Weaner, so great to look at his gorgeous slides with a grey, cold winter day outdoors.  Over lunch we learned the details and importance of APLD Certification from Susan Cohan, APLD, and Marti Neely, APLD; it was recommended that with changes coming to the certification process, that any member who is thinking about moving ahead with this should do it as soon as possible.  After a nice sandwich and salad lunch, we had lots of inspiration from Stone Man Dan Harney.  The talk was both artistic and practical, noting not only design applications and slides but of good stone techniques.
Stone Man Dan!
Captivated Audience!

APLD Leadership Conference
Philadelphia, PA
…photo from Susan Cohan

Four Good Books
     by Jeannie Marcucci
One of the nice things about winter (yes, there are some…) and it being too cold to do much outdoors is the opportunity to catch up on some overdue reading, especially if you had the good fortune of gathering a few new items at the holidays.
Starting my winter reading is Design in the Little Garden by Fletcher Steele.  This charming small book is published by the Library of  American Landscape History, the frontispiece a black and white photo of the author taken in 1930 in a three piece suit sitting in what appears to be a highly uncomfortable but tasteful carved stone garden chair.  In the introduction we read that it was the mission of Mr. Steele and colleagues to “educate ..homeowners in matters of taste” (p. xiii) as they left the city and moved into the suburbs. How good of them to take this on…

In Chapter II we read, ” It would not be surprising in this upside-down modern world if the next important step in garden design should be developed in cities and spread to the country” (p. 11.) The same could be said today of designers like Lynden Miller whose efforts transformed many derelict spaces in New York City but whose own garden had been featured and inspired many from the pages of Fine Gardening magazine. In Chapter V we feel as sense of nostalgia –or maybe cringe, or maybe laugh —with the “best bedding [list:]

  1. Box edging
  2. Alternate ageratum and Souvenir de Bonn abutilon
  3. Pink begonia
  4. Whitish pink begonia interrupted by one yellow calceolaria every fifth plant
  5. Red begonia and ageratum alternately
  6. (Middle line) standard roses 10 feet apart: halfway between, one large yellow calceolaria —the rest heliotrope

5,4,3,2,1 repeated” (p. 43.) I am glad I have available to me a larger plant palate …
Moving to the contemporary, is Michael Pollan’s Second Nature, a Gardener’s Education which I bought at City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco last fall.  A great book from a great bookstore.  It was published in 1991 and I managed to miss it even having read some of Pollan’s more recent books.  I remembered along with his writing some of my early experiences as a gardener, and the influence–both good and bad– of parents and grandparents on this endeavor.  The book is divided into sections by season, and Pollan takes us through his garden and hence his own gardening education, trials and successes. In the Summer chapter we red about roses and the author’s preparation for some heirloom roses brought by post as bare root. “As Gardener’s are fond of pointing out, the modern rose industry appears to have modeled itself after Detroit. Each year it introduces a handful of ‘exciting’ new models, many of them in improbable neon and metallic shades better suited to a four-door than a flower, and bearing a loud hypey name dreamed up on Madison Avenue and duly trademarked.   Chrysler Imperial is actually the name of a rose. So is Sunsation. And Broadway ( a two-toned wonder gaudy as a showgirl.) hoopla Hoop. Patsy Cline. Penthouse. Sweetie Pie. Twinkie. Teeny Bopper. Fergie. Innovation Minijet. Hotline. Ain’t Misbehavin’. Sexy Rexy. Givenchy. Graceland. Good Morning America. And Dolly Parton (a rose with, you have probably guessed, exceptionally large blossoms.)” (p. 83.) All true to Pollan’s witty style…

 

…..continued below sponsor page…..

 

 

Beauty of Bulbs
     by Bruce Crawford

 

 

One of the great pleasures of bulbs is their ability to provide the element of surprise!Whether the bulbs were planted this past fall or 10 falls past, we always forget where they are located and their colorful arrival is a welcomesurprise each year.  One of the other benefits is the longevity of bulbs, as many will not merely survive, but multiply and perhaps even naturalize in the garden.  Of course, the great challenge of their covert existence is the recollection of where they are located, since the element of surprise also means they can be dug up or damaged during those months when they lie dormant!

 

Interestingly, what gardeners and catalogues often lump under the heading of bulbs may not in fact be a bulb at all, but rather a corm or rhizome!  A true bulb consists of swollen leaves or leaf stalks, which are connected at the base by a modified stem called a basal plant.  The outer layers of a bulb are modified leaves called scales.  Scales contain the necessary food reserves to sustain the bulb during dormancy and during the early stages of growth.  The outermost scales become dryand form a papery covering called a tunic, which serves to prevent desiccation and predation.  At the center are embryonic flowers, leaves and stems while the roots develop from the basal plate.  Examples of true bulbs for the garden are Tulipia (Tulip), Narcissus (Daffodil), and Allium (Flowering Onion).

 

Corm is yet another type of ‘bulb’.  A corm is a swollen stem that has been modified for nutrient storage.  Eyes or growing points develop on top of the corm from which leaves and flowers develop.  Similar to bulbs, roots develop from the basal plate and it is covered by dried bases of the leaves or the tunic.  Examples include Crocus, Gladiolus and Colchicum (Autumn Crocus).  The last ‘bulb’ is a tuber, which is also a modified stem, but it lacks a basal plate and an outer tunic.  Roots, shootsand leaves emerge from eyes and it is nearly impossible to determine which side is up from down.  Examples are Cyclamen, Eranthis (Winter Aconite) and Anemone blanda (Wind Flower).

 

Most spring bulbs are native to drier regions of the world and these modified leaves or stems allow the plants to remain dormant and endure extended periods of extreme heat, drought or both.  Typically, they develop ‘true’ leaves, flower and set seed during spring when there is ample moisture and the temperatures are conducive to growth.  As the growing conditions become more inhospitable, dormancy quickly ensues!  In general, ‘bulbs’ are easy plants to grow, requiring full sun, good drainage and moderately fertile soils with a pH near neutral or even slightly alkaline. Bulbs with large underground structures of one inch or better are termed ‘Major Bulbs’.  Tulips, Daffodils and Hyacinths are good examples.  ‘Minor Bulbs’ have underground structures smaller than one inch, with Galanthus, Crocus and Chionodoxa serving as examples.  In general, ‘bulbs’ should be planted to a depth of 3x the diameter of the bulb.  If they are planted too shallow, they will produce numerous bulbets (small bulbs) or cormels (small corms) which are often too small to produce flowers.  This is the primary reason why older planting of bulbs only produce green foliage and not flowers.  As a general rule, bulbs are best transplanted before the old foliage has vanished or planted as early as possible in the fall.  Consider large sweeps of bulbs for the best possible impact in the Gardens.  For the major bulbs, think in terms of multiples of 50 and for the minor bulbs, anything under 300 will be underwhelming!  Typically, I plant the larger bulbs one to a hole, but for the minor bulbs, a more natural effect is achieved if 4 to 6 bulbs are planted per hole – hencethe need for at least 300!

 

Although unsightly, do not remove the bulb foliage until after it has completely yellowed or become dormant.   The foliage is producing the carbohydrates necessary to increase the size of the ‘bulb’ and correspondingly, the flower display for the following year.  Minor bulbs should be allowed to seed as they often naturalize beautifully.  Many bulb seeds have a small white starchy appendage called an elaiosome.  Ants are attracted to this appendage which usually has aromatic compounds and is rich in sugars, amino acids and oils.  Ants will abscond with the seed and consume the elaiosome or feed it to the developing young.  They will either just drop the seed if it is not in the ant hill or discard it in their various ‘Compost Bins’.  In this manner, the seeds are distributed far and wide and the plants naturalize!

 

Both major and minor types of bulbs can easily be accommodated in the mixed border or in meadow setting.  In perennial borders, use clumps of the larger (major) bulbs such as Allium, Narcissus or Camassia (American Potato) as they will be planted deeper and less likely to be disturbed.  The smaller (minor) bulbs reseed and are easily disturbed during division of the perennials.  However, this ability to reseed makes them great candidates for naturalizing in areas of the garden that will not be disturbed, such as areas beneath shrubs and in lawns.  In fact, many of the minor bulbs can be easily grown – and with luck, naturalized – in shrub borders or mixed borders beneath leggy and still slumbering deciduous shrubs.  Before the shrubs leaf out, there is adequate sun for the bulbs to flourish and mature.  Plus, the area beneath the shrubs is usually dry in the summer, creating the proper conditions for the bulbs to thrive.  If planting into lawns, select the earliest blooming bulbs, such that the foliage will have withered sufficiently by the first cut of turf.  Narcissus is best grown in areas with full sun, but not in lawns since this foliage does not become dormant until mid to late June or in moist years, July!

tulip

The challenge always becomes which bulbs to plant?  In general, I stay away from Tulip hybrids; they perform admirably during the first season, but subsequent years yield fewer and small blooms.  However, it you have a warm, sun drenched and dry location, consider some of the speciestulips, such as Tulipa tarda (pictured above).   As with Magnolias, the outer sepals and the inner petals appear identical and are therefore called tepals.  Appearing in May, the tepals are white with a yellow center and appear atop 8-10″ long stems. The back of the outer most tepals are blushed with purple, making it an attractive flower in both bud and bloom!

 

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Continued…Beauty of Bulbs
     by Bruce Crawford

 

 

For those gardeners with deer, Tulips are best avoided, since they are a deer delicacy!  However, there are still many choices that deer do not prefer.  One of my favorites for late February and early March is Eranthis hyemalis or Winter Aconite (above). Native to woodlands of France east to Bulgaria, this member of the Ranunculaceae or Buttercup family has bright yellow flowers that literally sit atop the foliage.  They will slowly naturalize and over a course of 50 years will spread throughout both shrubs and turf.  Obviously not ideal for those that prefer the perfect lawn, it is a refreshing sight come the end of winter and the plants are not deterred by mowing starting in April!  This plant is best moved about while it is still in leaf during early May, but if ordered from a catalogue, make certain that the tubers are soaked for 6-12 hours before planting.  Rehydrating the tubers is paramount to its success!

snowdrop

Another great bulb for those in deer country is Galanthus, commonly called Snowdrop.  From the Greek Gála for milk, ánthos for flower.  There are a number of different species from which to select, but they are all winners!  Plants typically start to bloom in late February, or as soon as the snow-pack melts. Galanthus nivalis, (picture above) is readily available in most bulb catalogues.  It too will readily seed into turf areas and is a delight to behold.  Unlike the tulip, it is the outer protective sepals that are enlarged and resemble true petals, while the petals are much reduced and are typically streaked with green.

 

The number of additional ‘bulbs’ is enormous, but I would be greatly remiss if I did not mention Crocus tommasinianus or Tommasini’s Crocus (pictured below).  Found growing on limestone hills in Dalmatia, plants bloom in late February into early March.  The straight species is one of the best for seeding and naturalizing into lawns as the foliage is very slender and does not look offensive in turf.

crocus

Bulbs, Corms and Tubers are a vast group of plants, but with their minimal maintenance requirements and number smiles of surprise they provide come spring, they should be far more common in the landscape.  My hope is that more of these treasures find their way into your garden and your spring will be filled with lasting smiles.

 

 

Continued….Four Good Books
     …by Jeannie Marcucci

The Power of Trees  by Gretchen Daily and Charles Katz, Jr. is a photo journey in black and white, “trees define our lives and the future of humanity” (page last.)Gretchen Daily is Bing Professor of Environmental Science at Stanford University; Charles Katz is an active photographer as well as a lawyer and business executive. He serves on the board of directors of the Nature Conservancy of Washington.

According to the authors, “after trees, Earth waited 165 million years before the first mammals appeared. And another 145 million years before the first monkey-like creatures swung from branch to branch in treetops.”

 

Last, I loved Vegetables: A Biography by Evelyne Block-Dano.

 

I learned that butter was once considered peasant food, the aristocracy preferring animal fat as a spread for bread; how the evolution, so to speak, of vegetables in diet came along with the evolution of cuisine and the acceptance of aristocracy to eat them, thus elevating them to a new status.  Thankfully!  This charming little book is a blend of history, like Pollan’s books, a peek into the human fascination for plants not only to eat, but for other things they provide us as they capture our senses and describe our culture and our time. The author includes many references to literature as well.  This from Samuel Beckett’s novel First Love: “I like parsnips because they taste like violets and violets because they smell like parsnips. Were there no parsnips on earth violets would leave me cold and if violets did not exist I would care as little for parsnips as I do for turnips, or radishes” (p.56.)

The book is also populated with a variety of recipes that correspond to the chapter.

 

A Call for Submissions….
Anybody looking to submit articles or photos for future newsletters please send your questions and material to:
Jeannie Marcucci
Jeannie Marcucci
APLD New Jersey Chapter Writer

APLDNJ NEWSLETTER – AUG, 2013

August 2013
August 2013
APLD NJ Newsletter
In This Issue
President’s Message
Detroit Conference
A Call for Submissions…
Chapter meeting/event Dates

 

 

August 13 Summer Plant Symposium with NJNLA

 

September 19

Brock Farms

 

October 25

Greenwood Gardens Tour, dinner following at The Boxcar, Short Hills

 

 

 

Dates to Remember
September 19

Brock Farms

 

October 25

Greenwood Gardens

Tour and Dinner

 

 

 

Our Sponsors

 

 

 

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President’s Message
President’s message:
Camaraderie, listening, looking, learning, seeing, planning,visiting, talking, note taking and photography were savored as APLD members went from financially troubled Detroit to visit gardens in some of the very most affluent suburbs in the US. A restored Frank Lloyd Wright home and garden, the Jens Jensen designed Edsel Ford estate property and the Ford truck division ten acre green roof were among the diverse landscape design sites seen. This conference was snappy, exciting and well organized. I was so glad to be there with six other chapter members. We missed those of you who could not attend.
Stay tuned for chapter events planned: next week, Tuesday, August 13 we have the Summer Plant Symposium at Rutgers Gardens where we are once again partnering with NJNLA. Then we have a meeting and tour at Brock Farms, our newest sponsor – Thursday, September 19 and a Greenwood Gardens tour on Friday, October 25 followed by a dinner at The Boxcar, Short Hills.  We are planning a visit to two Morris County Park sites in November, and an over night trip to Long Island in late July, early August 2014.
Jane
Jane Derickson-Friar

 

_________________________________________________

This just in!

News and photos from the APLD National Conference

Out and Touring at Conference

Lake St. Clair

Shoreline Detroid

From Laurel Von Gerichten, Laurelbrook Design
Jeffrey White designed a lakefront residence that included a natural shoreline with aquatic plants to soften the banks.  Lake St. Clair has almost no remaining marshland due to development, with recreational boating making the waters choppy.  It is a challenge to restore the shoreline due to many local regulations as well.  Shoreline restoration is a relatively new area in which designers can become certified.

 

Photos From Detroit 2013 Conference

APLD NJ Representation at Detroit Conference

2013 APLD Conference Attendees

front row:
DespinaMetaxatos Laurel vonGerichten, APLD

back row:

Jane Derickson; Susan Cohan, APLD (APLD President Elect); Susan Olinger, APLD (APLD 2012 Past President); Jock Lewendon, APLD (APLD Treasuer & Secretary); Pamela Dabah.

Susan Olinger, APLD Receives Award Susan Olinger Receives Award

Susan Olinger, APLD was presented with a gift thanking her for her work on the APLD Board in her role as 2012 Past President.

Out and About…

Farmington Hills Garden

Photo Submitted by Susan Olinger
Farmington Hills Garden

Turkel House
Frank Lloyd Wright Architecture

Turkel House

Photo submitted by Susan Olinger

Turkel House Garden
Frank Lloyd Wright Architecture

Turkel House Garden

Photo submitted by Susan Olinger

Garden by Daryl Toby
Aquafina

Aquafina Garden

Gathered are a group of members in a garden designed by Daryl Toby of Aquafina.  Huge boulders and steel define the space, which is accented with colorful foliage plants and contemporary sculpture.
Photo submitted by Susan Olinger

 

Annual Color Splash

Detroit, 2013
Planted out beds

APLD Members

Detroit, 2013
APLD Group
APLD Conferences are about the power of showing up with a mind open to the experience. Who knew that in Detroit what we see in the media is only a small part of the story?  I would not have known it was a city full of hope, opportunity, and incredible landscape design if I hadn’t gone. Thank you APLD….from Susan Cohan
!

 

Bravo, Detroit!
by Despina Metaxatos
The conference was a great introduction to Detroit, I enjoyed meeting everyone and seeing inspired green spaces and gardens both public and private…
What better way to see the Motor City that in a motorized scooter like the Segway? Two groups of conference goers took the opportunity Friday afternoon to roll around Detroit highlights.  After a safety video and a few practice turns and rolls, we headed along the Riverwalk on a breezy afternoon, as far as Milliken State Park.  We admired the newly native  plantings and oriented ourselves with the thoughtfully presented area map etched in the concrete (If I had known Canada was that close, I’d have brought my passport!)
Then we made a left turn and rolled along the Dequindre Cut Greenway, formerly a Grand Trunk railway line below street level.  Here and there, the stone walls were decorated with the most artistic graffiti I have seen (murals, really).  There was plenty of room to roam along the 20 foot wide path; coming from the NYC metro area’s crowded parks (where Segways are illegal), I felt the word needs to get out to Detroiters about their great new parks–we encountered just a few joggers.  Low population density and wide sidewalks made the Segway a natural choice.
The Campus Martius Park and Lafayette Gardens, our last two highlights, demonstrated innovative ways of rethinking urban public space; the first transforming a little-used central city concrete plaza into a multiuse venue featuring a cafe, concert and movie venue, an urban sandy beach that turns into a skating rink in winter, while retaining the historical statue and improving pedestrian flow–Bravo!
Lafayette Gardens was the solution to a deteriorating city center office building slated for demolition.  Instead of rebuilding, the city created breathing room and universal access with this raised metal container bed garden, featuring whimsical sculptures made from recycled material, biodiverse plantings, a veggie garden and bioswale.  Again, Bravo Detroit!

 

NJNLA Summer Plant Symposium
August 13, 2013  Rutgers Gardens, New Brunswick
  Registration begins at 8:30am
Garden Center and Landscape Design tours depart at 9am
Landscape Industry Classes start at 9am
Rutgers Gardens tours start at 3pm
Tree demonstrations begin at 3pm
barbecue begins at 3:30pm
Keynote speaker John Gwynne at 6 PM
Rare plant live auction at 7 PM
For registration call:609-291-7070
or by web www.njnla.org

 

 

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A Call for Submissions….
Anybody looking to submit articles or photos for future newsletters please send your questions and material to:
Jeannie Marcucci
Jeannie Marcucci

APLD New Jersey Chapter Writer

February 2013 Newsletter

February 2013
Chapter Event Dates
February 14-17

Booth at the NJ

Flower and Garden

Show

 

 

February 27

Booth at the NJLCA

Trade Show

 

 

March 7

APLDNJ

Winter Workshop

 

 

March 21-24

Booth at the

Flower Show

(Morristown)

 

 

April 3

Sponsor Meet

and Greet Event

 

 

April 10-11

Booth at Atlantic

Builders Convention

 

 

June 27

Meeting,Tour and

Dinner at Fernbrook Nursery

with ASLA

 

 

August 13

Summer Plant

Symposium

with NJNLA

 

 

More events to be added soon….

 

 

Dates to Remember
February12 – 14

MAHTS

Atlantic City, NJ

 

February

11 – 12

19 – 20

28 – Mar 1

NJLCA

February Workshops

Piscataway and

Elmwood Park, NJ

 

February

14 – 17

New Jersey Flower and Garden Show
Edison, NJ

 

February 21

Bowman’s Hill

Wildflower Preserve

13th Annual Land Ethics’Symposium
February 27

NJLCA

NJ Landscape

2013

Secaucus, NJ

 

February

27 – 28

Ecological Landscaping

Association

ELA Conference

Springfield, MA

 

March 2

NJNPS

New JerseyNative Plant SocietyAnnual Meeting

 

March 7

APLDNJ

Winter Workshop

Morristown, NJ

 

March 21 – 24

The Flower Show

Morristown, NJ

 

April 3

APLDNJ

Sponsor

Meet and Greet

Event

Short Hills, NJ

 

April 10-11

Atlantic Builders Convention

Atlantic City, NJ

 

August 2 – 4

APLD

2013 InternationalDesign Conference

Detroit, Michigan

 

August 13

NJNLA

Summer Plant Symposium

Rutgers Gardens

New Brunswick,

NJ

 

 


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President’s Message
Dear APLD NJ Members,
Hello, my name is Jane Derickson and I’m your new Chapter President. I’m looking forward to an exciting year…..
Suzanne Bergeron is our new Treasurer. She will also keep her current duties as Secretary. Elaine Stevenson will continue as our Trade Show chair. Jock Lewendon, our Immediate Past President, will continue to stay involved as our Membership chair and Advocacy chair. Jeannie Marcucci will continue to be in charge of our Newsletter. As you can see there are some double duties being performed so if anyone would like to get involved we would definitely appreciate it.
January is gone! We did have a booth at NJNLA‘s NJ PLANTS show on January 22 – 23. There was a NEW LOOK to our booth thanks to Elaine Stevenson, who continues to out do herself! Many thanks to Elaine and all the people who helped staff the booth over the 2 days. In February we will have a booth at two more shows so please show your support by either staffing the booth or stopping by at the show to say hello. It’s a great time to meet new people and make new connections.
Our APLDNJ Winter Workshop on March 7 is shaping up to be an event you don’t want to miss. This years’ theme: Landscape Design – from Historic Preservation to Award Winning Presentations! will include 3 notable speakers. Click HERE for more information.

Binomial Nomenclature

Botanic verses Common Name

Welcome to one of the more confusing aspects of plants – their names! Although the naming of plants was established to make plant identification easier and more efficient, it will take time to become familiar with the nomenclature process. Every plant has both a common name and a botanical name. Common names are initially more user friendly and easier to remember since they are typically words used in a country’s native language – and we may have heard them before! Unfortunately, they vary from country to country, as well as within regions of a country or even from gardener to gardener. Several years ago I was at the JC Ralston Arboretum at NC State, and the director referred to Cleome as Cat Whiskers. Cat Whiskers is a great name, which with some imagination described the plant perfectly. However, I had never heard of it before and would not have known to which plant he was referring if we had not been standing directly in front of the plant. I might add that the plants were also totally dead at the time, which certainly helped to further my confusion!

Botanical names are generally in Latin, although they are often derived from the ancient Greek or they can be ‘latinized’ names of people. For example, Charles Sargent, the first Director of the Arnold Arboretum becomes sargentii, as in Viburnum sargentii or Père Farges, the French missionary who was stationed in China becomes Fargesia as in Decaisnea fargesii (the Blue Bean Tree) or Fargesia rufa (Umbrella Bamboo). Organisms, both plant and animal began having Latin and Greek names during the medieval period, since it was the language of the scholars (the Bible was initially written in Greek). Initially, these organisms were given a polynomial description. This consisted of a genus (plural being genera), which is a group of similar plants followed by a cumbersome descriptive phrase that described the type of plant. For example, Catnip was called Nepeta floribus interrupte specatus pedunculatis (Nepeta with flowers in an interrupted pedunculate spike). Or Dianthus caryophyllus was Dianthus floribus solitariis, squamis calycinus subovatus brevissimis, corollis crenatus (Dianthus or Divine Flower with separate blossoms, scaly calyx and scalloped petal edges). Obviously, this style of describing an organism had inherent problems for those with memory dysfunction, including me! In 1753, a Swede by the name of Carolus Linnaes (Linnaeus) (1707-1778) identified this problem and created a simpler system: the Binomial Nomenclature System. Although he still used the genera name for the plant, he reduced the descriptive phrase to a one word descriptive name called the species. For example, he used the name cateria to describe the previously mentioned Catnip (Nepeta cataria). The advantages for this system are more than obvious, especially as the number of authored plants and animals proliferated.

Linnaeus grouped the plants together by the number and arrangement of the stamens, which are the pollen or male gametophyte baring part of the flower. Interestingly, he called the stamens husbands and the pistils (the female or egg baring portion of the plant) the wives. The flower was called the ‘Marriage Bed’! Actually, to the modern day non plant phyle, this is an interesting and understandable manner in which a flower could be described. However, in the 1700′s a reference to ‘sex’ was deemed inappropriate and Linnaeus’s work was not met with the most robust relief that one might think. In fact a competing and perhaps jealous botanist named Johann Siegesbeck went so far as to call it ‘loathsome harlotry’! With the same gusto that runs interoffice politics in large corporations, Linnaeus retorted by naming a common European weed, Siegesbeckia after poor Johann. The name is still in existence today. Moral of the story – never mess with a plant geek!

Binomial Rules

The binomial (two-name or two-part) nomenclature was rapidly accepted. At present, the plant kingdom is classified by the descending ranks of the plant tree. The example below is for Nepeta:

  • Kingdom [Plantae]
  • Division [Tracheophyta]
  • Class [Angiospermae]
  • Order [Lamiales]
  • Family [Labiatae]
  • Genus (plural genera) [Nepeta]
  • Species (abbreviated spp or sp) [cataria]
  • Botanical variety (abbreviated var)
  • Cultivated variety (a cultivar, abbreviated clv) ['Walkers Low']

 

For the purpose of this class, we are principally concerned with the ranks from Genera down to cultivar. However, knowing the general traits of a family can help you narrow the possibilities of plant names, in case you come in contact with a plant you have not seen before. It will also be helpful if you wish to aspire to the level of plant geekdom.

 

Botanical names are presently classified by the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature and are revised every 5 years at the International Botanical Congress. This two part nomenclature consists of the genus (which is capitalized) and the descriptive species name (non -capitalized). When written, both names are either underlined or italicized. For example:

 

Nepeta cataria or Nepeta cataria

What exactly is a species? In Latin, it simply translates to ‘kind’. Obviously, there are many ‘kinds’ of organisms in nature! It is the descriptive aspect of the name and usually describes some aspect of the plant. For example:

  • glauca is a waxy coating giving a portion of the plant a ‘blue’ color
  • purpureum refers to something purple, such as the leaf, stem, center of the stem, root, etc.
  • sargentii – a plant that was initially allowed to be given a species epithet for the person that discovered the plant, or in recognition of a person that promoted the travels or the discovery of the plant. Sargent was the first director of the Arnold Arboretum and his name is associated with many plants. Sasa veitchii is in recognition of the Veitch nursery that funded many expeditions to china. The law has been changed, and plants can no longer be given species names in honor of an individual.
  • tomentosa refers to a wooly or tomentose part of the plant (usually the leaf or the stem)
  • verticillata refers to a whorled or verticillata arrangement of the leaves or flowers
  • And on it goes!!

 

To further complicate matter, plants are broken down into varieties (abbreviated var.) and cultivars. Cultivar is short for cultivated variety (abbreviated clv). For example: Geranium sanguineum var. striatum vs. Geranium sanguineum ‘Max Frei’.

  • Geranium sanguineum var. striatum is a seed strain, which is shorter than the species population (height of 12″ verses 24″) and has light pink (occasionally white) flowers with deep pink venation within the flower. It is a population of plants found on the island of Lancaster off of the United Kingdom. The population is not sufficiently distinct to have a species title, but when this population is planted in isolation from the species, the seedlings will resemble the parent population. In other words, when planted separately, they seed true.
  • Geranium sanguineum ‘Max Frei’ is a cultivar. It has deep pink flowers and unlike the species, only grows to 6″ tall. However, when planted in isolation, the seedlings will range in height from the cultivar height of 6″ to the species height of 24″. Gradually, almost the entire population will usually revert back to the 24″ height, although some may retain the shorter height.

 

Varieties are populations of a species that have become isolated from the parent population, but do not differ significantly to merit a species rank of designation. Varieties usually have slight alterations in form, size, color of leaf or flower, or some other physical attribute and come true from seed. A cultivar is a selection often made by an individual and usually does not come true from seed. There are exceptions, such as Echinacea purpurea ‘Magnus’, a cultivar of Purple Cone Flower that does come true from seed. Cultivar status is not italicized, but is capitalized and parenthesized. For the person, university or company that is in the business of making money from plant breeding through the introduction of named selections, the cultivars are registered and a royalty for a period of 20 years comes back to the licensed legal entity under which the plant is registered. This was common practice for a number of years, until it became obvious that some very good plants took a much longer period of time to become popular in the trade. At the 20 years mark, they were still pulling in good royalties or were perhaps just becoming known and starting to attract good royalties. However, since the legal period of protection was at an end, any company was now free to produce the plant without paying royalties. This resulted in the initiation of Trade Marked names. These plants typically have an awkward or unpronounceable cultivar name and a well promoted Trade Mark name. The cultivar name has the typical 20 year term of protection, while the Trade Marked name lasts in perpetuity. Trade Marked names are proceeded by a TM signature and lack parenthesis around the name. An example is Cornus x CelestialTM (‘Rutdan’) PP #7204. After 20 years, plant patent 7204 (PP#7204) will expire and any company or person can reproduce and sell the plant as Cornus x ‘Rutdan’. However, since all the promotion has focused upon the Trade Marked name of Celestial, most people will not recognize the cultivar name and the plant will not sell. The name of Celestial is good for eternity, and the royalties will continue to be paid to the legal owner. Trade Marking is obviously key for plants of great worth, such as Magnolia grandiflora ‘Brackens Brown Beauty’ which is not Trade Marked and the plant patent has now expired.

The grex or ‘x’ that follows the genus indicates that the plant is a cross between two species. In the case of Cornus x ‘Rutdan’, it is a cross of Cornus florida and Cornus kousa. If the grex precedes a genus, than this indicates that this is a cross between two different genera. An example is X Fatshedera, which is a cross between the two genera of Fatsia and Hedera. As one can see, plant breeders and the legal system have made things a mess for us plant lovers! However, it does have beneficial financial returns. Dr. Michael Dirr – a common name in horticultural circles – recently explored remontent or repeat flowering in Hydrangea macrophylla species. His breeding led to the introduction of several new cultivars. In one year, one million cuttings of Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Endless Summer’ were sold at a royalty of 60 cents per cutting. A return of $600,000!

Another complication is the introduction of an intermediate rank in nomenclature of subspecies. Subspecies are normally abbreviated subsp or ssp, such as Molinia caerulea subsp. caerulea. The first subspecies described is always given the same name as the species. Subsequent subspecies are given different descriptive names, such as Molinia caerulea subsp. arundinacea. When subsequent subspecies are described, it is then assumed that the genus and species name refer to the original subspecies. That is, Molinia caerulea refers to Molinia caerulea subsp. caerulea. The various subspecies have minute differences from the original species and they will breed true if the populations are kept distinct and separate.

The difference between Varieties and Subspecies is very small – if a difference exists at all! Subspecies distinction is preferred on the West Coast (University of California) while varietal distinction is preferred on the East Coast (Harvard). Supposedly, varieties develop from geological isolation (a good example being Trilliums), while subspecies development can be traced to a single parent plant. If you give this some thought, varieties can no doubt be traced to a single parent plant as well. Both subspecies and varieties seed true, which is one of the major distinctions between these and cultivar status.

Botanical names are most typically followed by an authority or author who was the person that first identified or named the plant. For example, it is Nepeta cataria (L), with the L standing for Linnaeus. Authors have to describe and identify the plant, as well as publish this description, assuring the public that this is a new plant that has not been previously introduced. In some cases, plants may have had two names in common use at one time, for example Hosta and Funkia. Although Funkia was the original name in commerce, it was later discovered that N.T. Host was the original author and was given ultimate credit and name recognition. Obviously, prior to the rapid dissemination of the written word of the modern day, there were multiple names and descriptions of the same plant. In some cases, a plant is reclassified to a different genus upon further study. For example, the native grass Uniola latifolia was originally described by Michaux. A botanist by the name of Haris Yates determined that this grass was best described under the genus Chasmanthium, and the name was changed to Chasmanthium latifolium. Hence you will now see the authority as C. latifolium (Michaux) Yates, acknowledging both describing authors.

Final Thoughts

The complexities of plant names extend far beyond this simplified account. Most cultivars are reproduced by asexual methods, such as division, cutting or budding in order to maintain the desired plant characteristics. Obviously, this refutes the aim of nature, which is sexual and enhances genetic diversity. To the gardener and the designer, this is a point of constant attention and contention. How do you design and plant the garden such that the original integrity is maintained and seedling plants do not alter the original design intent? Obviously, good design as well as plant and maintenance knowledge is needed in order to design a garden that will remain true to your thoughts for many years to come. This is one of the aims of this course, and hopefully one of your lifelong pursuits. For the natural purist, cultivar selections are not the plant of choice, due to the reduced genotype and selection created by a monoculture. For the controlling – and perhaps over-controlling – designer, the need for an exact height, flower or leaf color, etc prescribes that the cultivar or variety is the plant of choice.

These battles, along with other not yet known, will continue to wan and grow as different trends become fashionable or demand attention. There will never be clearly defined answer and ultimately it is the heart and energy of the designer which will define which is best for a particular garden. Best of luck in your decisions!!!

 

Written by Bruce Crawford, Director at Rutgers Gardens

Happiness is a Native Landscape

written by Laurel Von Gerichten

A few years ago, I had no idea that I would become an advocate for native plants. For one, the New York Botanical Garden, where I received my Certificate in Landscape Design, is an institution devoted to collecting plants from all over the globe.

Secondly, I had for many years worked in my own garden, enthusing over the bright blossoms in nursery catalogs, hoping to find space for the latest favorite, which back then was most certainly not native.

And thirdly, my mindset was that of a diligent homeowner, following the gardening advice given in magazines for such tasks as fertilizing the lawn, shearing the shrubs, and spraying for bugs.

I was keeping my lawn mowed and flowerbeds tidy, doing the right thing. Why then should I change?

Upon graduation from the NYBG I joined Metro Hort, a group of professionals meeting monthly in NYC. I remember coming away from one particular lecture feeling somewhat shocked at what I had heard.

The message, delivered by Dr. Douglas Tallamy, head of the entomology department at the University of Delaware, was that biodiversity depends upon native plants. If this were true, then what were we doing in the horticultural trade, extolling the exotics? “Pest-free” took on a whole different meaning: a plant that might as well be plastic because it supports no life. And if insects were important after all, then what was I doing with the poison sprayer?

My whole orientation started to change from that day, as I attended more lectures and symposia, read books, observed with a new eye, and began to learn about biodiversity, venturing further into subjects such as geology, wetlands, soil science, plant communities, plant response to feeding, and organic practices. Fascinating discoveries in these fields reveal how much more we have to learn about nature and proper environmental stewardship. As naturalist and Harvard entomologist Edward O. Wilson writes in Biophilia, “..it is possible to spend a lifetime in a magellanic voyage around the trunk of a single tree.”

In contrast to my increasing awareness of biodiversity and the inter-connectedness of systems, my suburban neighborhood consists of houses skirted by foundation evergreens with lawns, overrun by mowing and leaf-blowing crews, extending to the curb. In such a setting, a landscape as garden sanctuary and habitat for wildlife seems a foreign concept. And yet, when reviewing the planting plans that introduce natives, my clients respond with enthusiasm to the choices I offer. Many of the native shrubs and perennials are unknown to them and thus, ironically, “exotic”.

One of my beginning native projects was for a small house surrounded by lawn and a chain-link fence. A corner view shows newly-planted shrubs in the bed cut out of the lawn curving around an existing dogwood.

laurel #1

The loamy soil and full sun encouraged fantastic growth of the plantings, unlike anything I’d seen in my own yard with much shade and more clay.

 

In their third season, this is the view of shrubs and perennials surrounding the dogwood.

laurel #4

Against the “grove” of Chokeberry (Aronia arbutifolia- Photinia pyrifolia) with its red berries wave wands of Goldenrod (Solidigo rugosa), mingling with the white tufts of Snakeroot (Eupatorium rugosa) and blue blossoms of Asters. Native plantings have transformed a small featureless yard into a spectacle of abundance that also renders the chain link fence invisible.

A recent project was “reimagining” a small entry courtyard in a condominium complex. The previous plantings, distorted from years of shearing, had been removed to repair termite damage.

laurel # 3

Inspired by a trip to Zion Canyon in Utah, I created a lush “floodplain” on both sides of the pathway which I envisioned as a meandering stream.

laurel #5

laurel #6

With sweet pepperbush (Clethra alnifolia), winterberry (Ilex verticillata), inkberry (Ilex glabra), Virginia sweetspire (Itea virginica), and a serviceberry (Amelanchier sp.), there are changing blossoms and foliage color, berries, and fragrance. My client loves how the plants move in response to the wind, a scene of animation in contrast to the former stationary forms. As the plants mature, the pathway will provide a welcoming journey full of soft textures and many shades of green.

Both clients have views that attract them just outside their doorsteps. Perhaps already they are seeing new things, like the amazing activity of bees, butterflies, and other flying insects, or the hungry robin who discovered fruit on the Amelanchier. I am encouraged to continue using natives for other projects, especially when I heard two different clients say that they feel happy living where they do now, after years of indifference. I had not realized that a garden full of life can have this kind of psychological effect, so I was moved and pondered how that could be. E. O. Wilson defined “biophilia” as “the innate tendency to focus on life and lifelike processes.” I believe that, as my clients become involved in the natural world outside, their spirit of biophilia is being nourished, thanks to the natives.

 

Laurel Von Gerichten, APLD, is president

of Laurelbrook Design, Inc.

- a landscape design firm she established in 2006.

732-310-1107

 

Native plant communities feature

prominently in her planting designs.

 

Editor’s note: This article originally appeared in Spring 2012 issue of The Designer published by the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD).

PHOTOS OF PAST EVENTS
The Duke Farms tour – this past June 19th

 

the tour group
The tour begins

 

Paul Smith giving out information
Paul Smith explaining the bio-swales

 

Paul explaining the community garden
the very large community garden

 

 

the Duke Farm Barn
the Farm Barn – Orientation Center

 

A word about our Featured Sponsor…

   

About The Terre Company of NJ, Inc.:

The Terre Company was founded in 1925 and has been owned by the Feury family since 1960. The company originally started as a farm-fertilizer blending company that serviced the New Jersey “Truck Farms” (hence the name “Garden State”) which supplied New York with fresh vegetables and fruit. As the farms developed into residential homes, golf courses, and sports fields, the Terre Company adapted to the changes. In 1979, The Terre Company moved to its current 5 acre facility located in Clifton, New Jersey. This facility allowed the company to service its markets from an ideal location, and provided room for the expansion of product offerings. The company then began to provide a far more extensive line of products to accommodate a more diverse group of customers.

In 1987, the nursery division of Terre was established, making The Terre Company a true one stop shop for the turf and landscape market. Terre now services the golf course, landscape, sports field, and garden center market in New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania. Products available include grass seed, fertilizer, chemicals, plant material, mulches, soils, and a host of miscellaneous related products.

www.terrecompany.com

 

Vice president of the Nursery Division, Tom Fuery at our

Sponsor “Meet and Greet” event earlier this year.

Some of our Bronze Sponsors….

Walpole Woodworkers

Our GOLD Sponsor:

716-691-3061

www.exbricks.com

A Call for Submissions….
Anybody looking to submit articles or photos for future newsletters please send your questions and material to:
Jeannie Marcucci
Jeannie Marcucci
APLD New Jersey Chapter Writer
Copyright 2013 Association of Professional Landscape Designers, New Jersey Chapter, All Rights Reserved.